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My All Raw Timelapse Workflow

Here's a series of there videos I produced about an all-raw Timelapse workflow. This was shot partially on location at the Panama Canal.

Part 1 — Shooting & Raw Processing


Part 2 — Assembling in After Effects


Part 3 — Color Grading and Filtering Timelapse Scenes



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DSLR Video, Terry White, and Matt Kloskowski — Photofocus Podcast 10/5/13

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This week’s show is a triple feature… we tackle three areas of the photo industry that are hot topics. First up, Scott Bourne interviews Rich Harrington about how to get started in DSLR video. Rich Harrington then takes the microphone and talks to Terry White from Adobe about changes at Adobe as well as Terry’s photography. Our third segment, Melissa Niu interviews Matt Kloskowski of Kelby Training to find out about how the photo industry is evolving.
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Mastering aperture: DSLR Video Tips

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How much light does your camera see? The aperture of your camera is its portal to the light in your scene (and without light, there are no pictures or video). Controlling the aperture is essential to getting the right amount of light on to your camera’s sensor to capture the best shots.
There’s another side to aperture as well. As you open the aperture wider, you can narrow the depth of field in your shot, blurring more of the frame outside of your immediate focus area. This is often a hallmark of the “DSLR video” look. Mastering aperture is critical to high-quality video and photos.
This week we cover

  • What is aperture? Learn why the aperture is critical to good exposure, and how to access it on your lens.
  • A DP’s perspective on aperture Catch up with director of photography Jim Ball and learn how he uses aperture when shooting in different situations.
  • Adjusting the aperture Learn how to make adjustments to the settings on your camera to get the best results.
  • Real-world examples We’ll evaluate several shots, breaking down what worked and what didn’t.


Check out both the sample video above and
this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you get the best exposure, and control the depth of field of your shots!

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A Detailed HDR Webinar

A detailed HDR Workflow webinar. We take a look at the brand new Photomatix beta release. Speakers Include:
  • Ron Pepper — HDRsoft
  • Hal Schmitt — Director of LIGHT Photographic Workshops
  • Kim Seng (Captain Kimo) — HDR Expert

Photofocus Team:
  • Richard Harrington
  • Melissa Niu
  • Levi Sim
  • Abba Shapiro

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Try Out the New Photomatix 5 for Free

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You can download the beta here:  
http://www.hdrsoft.com/download/betas/pmp50.php. Here are a few notes from HDRsoft.

Photomatix Pro version 5.0 is currently in beta testing phase. You are welcome to help us test the beta releases, but please note the following:
-

  • Beta releases are not stable versions of the software. They may not work properly and they may crash often.
  • Beta releases are intended for testing purposes only, and should not be used for normal use and production work.
  • Beta releases of Photomatix Pro include the usual registration system of normal versions, i.e. they run in trial mode when the software has not been registered.
  • Beta releases are not supported. If you need support with running Photomatix Pro, please download the official release of Photomatix Pro instead

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Adam Elmakias and Lightroom 5.2 — Photofocus Podcast 9/25/13

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This week’s show is a double dose of Photo inspiration that will work both sides of your brain.  First we take a look at new Adobe tech for Lightroom and Camera Raw, then we jump over and catch up with music photographer Adam Elmakias.  Join hosts Rich Harrington and Melissa Niu for interviews with important thought leaders.

Lightroom 5.2 and Adobe Camera Raw 8.2 Updates

Rich catches back up with Sharad Mangalick, product manager for Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Camera Raw.  Adobe is shipping a new update that adds a lot of cool features for both Creative Cloud and CS6 users.
Rich and Sharad discuss:
  • What specific change will we see in Camera Raw
  • What small tweaks have been improved
  • What can you do with video clips
  • What are some new Lightroom specific changes
  • How to get access to tech early with Adobe Labs
  • Where can you learn more about Lightroom

Follow Sharad on Twitter — www.twitter.com/smangalick

Adam Elmakias

Adam Elmakias is a music and travel photographer based out of San Diego, California. He started shooting at age 16 by going to local shows with his camera.  This eventually grew into applying for photo passes, then going out on the road with bands. He’s spent the last several years touring almost nonstop. Adam is also one of the most followed photographers on Instagram.
Melissa Niu catches up with Adam:
  • Who is Adam and what does he do?
  • How does is monetize his work?
  • How did Adam get his foot in the door and grow?
  • Why trust has been essential in the process?
  • Advice on working with social media
  • Gear talk: what he uses and how
  • How he gets his unique photos
  • What advice does he offer to those starting out?
  • Where to find Adam online?

Follow Adam on Twitter — www.twitter.com/elmakias
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Combining Blur Gallery Filters


Want to learn about the Blur Gallery? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to combine blur gallery filters in Adobe Photoshop.

Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
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Using the History Brush


Wanting to combine multiple states of an image? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to utilize the History Brush in Adobe Photoshop.

Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
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Time-lapse video tutorial: Basic moves on a slider


In this tutorial explore the basics of working with a Kessler camera slider in order to shoot time-lapse photography. Topics include setting the shoot's start and end points, adjusting the axis of the camera, and tips for keeping flicker out of your shots, including engaging the mirror lock-up and turning of noise reduction. Watch more at
http://www.lynda.com/After-Effects-tu.... This tutorial is a single movie from the Creating Time-Lapse Video course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 3 hours and 27 minutes. Get on-location tips and post-production techniques to speed up time and create compelling visual effects with time-lapse photography.

  • Introduction
  • 1. What Is Time-Lapse Photography?
  • 2. Technical Essentials
  • 3. Equipment: What You'll Need and Might Want
  • 4. Choosing a Shooting Format
  • 5. A Better Timeline Panel
  • 6. The Exposure Triangle in Depth
  • 7. Using a Slider
  • 8. Shooting Time Lapse on a Smartphone or Tablet
  • 9. Managing Data from a Time-Lapse Shoot
  • 10. Organizing the Images for Post
  • 11. Developing the Images for Post
  • 12. Assembling a Time-Lapse Movie with Adobe Photoshop
  • 13. Assembling a Time-Lapse Movie with Adobe After Effects
  • 14. Assembling a Time-Lapse Movie with Adobe Premiere Pro
  • 15. Assembling a Time-Lapse Movie with Apple Final Cut Pro X
Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

Start a 7-day free trial to lynda.com 
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Photographers Tamara Lackey & Joel Grimes plus Facebook’s New Policy — Photofocus Podcast 9/15/13

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Here is the new podcast feed: 
feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Get the show here  or get it on iTunes
This week’s show is a triple scoop of goodness.  We’ve got three interviews to satisfy your creative, technical, and business needs. Join hosts
Rich Harrington and Melissa Niu for interviews with important thought leaders.
First up, Rich talks with Tamara Lackey who is a professional photographer, speaker, and author. She focusses on  lifestyle photography, from children’s portraits to celebrity portraits.  Tamara’s work has been featured in dozens of media outlets, including Parenting Magazine, O – The Oprah Magazine, Town & Country, Vogue, Food & Wine, Men’s Journal, Nikon World, Professional Photographer Magazine, Rangefinder Magazine, Photoshop User Magazine, NBC’s The Martha Stewart Show, ABC’s Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, PBS’ Need to Know and NBC’s The Today Show.


Rich and Tamara discuss:

  • What she’s been working on lately
  • The What If Day Camps to recharge your creativity
  • How bringing art and business together taught her a lesson
  • Tips on balancing your personal, business, and family life
  • Three things that you can do to change bad habits that are holding you back
  • Practicing with your equipment so you know it cold

Next up, Melissa Niu sets down with Joel Grimes. Joel is a commercial advertising photographer with a distinct style. His unique approach has earned him work from top advertising agencies and art buyers.

Melissa and Joel discuss:
  • How he started out
  • Advice for branding your work
  • How Joel defined his look
  • How compositing and digital photography affected his workflow
  • What you need to do to master your look
  • Advantages of HDR
  • Our handicaps and the beauty of working and overcoming them
  • How his color blindness affected and contributed to his look
  • Tips to achieve your goals

Last up, we dig deep into the recent
Facebook controversy. Photographers are giving up even more rights by posting to the social network.  We went straight to the top to get a leading legal expert.  Terry Hart, the Director of Legal Policy for the Copyright Alliance breaks through the hype and rumors and walks us through the real repercussions.
Rich and Terry discuss:
  • Why is this Facebook change creating such a buzz
  • Why Facebook wants your content
  • What are you granting Facebook to do with your content?
  • What Facebook says they will do versus what the terms of service says they can do
  • Suggestions on how to protect your interests when using a social network
  • Why watermarking your content won’t protect you
  • Can you change your mind and “un-post” content?
  • How to use 3rd party sites to share links
  • Why is this becoming  a legal issue and Congress getting involved?
  • How can groups like the Copyright Alliance and American Society of Media Photographers help?
  • Where can you go to learn more about copyright
Disclaimer: This show presents several ideas and techniques that we hope help you.  These are just some ways of approaching the issues at hand.  Combine with your own skill for best results.
Download  — http://photofocuspodcast.libsyn.com/webpage
Hosted by Rich Harrington and Melissa Niu
Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes — http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photofocus/id512223214

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The Refine Edge Command for Better Selections and Adjustments


Are you trying to adjust a selection? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to use the Refine Edge Command in Adobe Photoshop.

Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
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Time-lapse Tutorial: Tracking the Sun's Position


When, and for how long, are you shooting your time-lapse sequence? Sun position can play a vital role in your shoot and knowing the sun's location ahead of time can help you plan ahead. In this tutorial, learn how to use the Sun Seeker app, available for both iOS and Android devices, in order to track the location of the sun. Watch more at
http://www.lynda.com/After-Effects-tu....
This tutorial is a single movie from the Creating Time-Lapse Video course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 3 hours and 27 minutes. Get on-location tips and post-production techniques to speed up time and create compelling visual effects with time-lapse photography.
  • Introduction
  • 1. What Is Time-Lapse Photography?
  • 2. Technical Essentials
  • 3. Equipment: What You'll Need and Might Want
  • 4. Choosing a Shooting Format
  • 5. A Better Timeline Panel
  • 6. The Exposure Triangle in Depth
  • 7. Using a Slider
  • 8. Shooting Time Lapse on a Smartphone or Tablet
  • 9. Managing Data from a Time-Lapse Shoot
  • 10. Organizing the Images for Post
  • 11. Developing the Images for Post
  • 12. Assembling a Time-Lapse Movie with Adobe Photoshop
  • 13. Assembling a Time-Lapse Movie with Adobe After Effects
  • 14. Assembling a Time-Lapse Movie with Adobe Premiere Pro
  • 15. Assembling a Time-Lapse Movie with Apple Final Cut Pro X
Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

Start a 7-day free trial to lynda.com 
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Using Random Fills in Photoshop


Do you want to create a pattern using a photo? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he utilizes Random Fills in Adobe Photoshop.

Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
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Using Photoshop Layer Comps


Do you want to store the state of several layers? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to use layer comps in Adobe Photoshop.

Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
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New Class on Micro Four Thirds Photography


I'm proud to announce my new class on Micro Four-Thirds video and photo. I am so excited about this new technology and how liberating it is for shooting. This was shot with one of meet best friends, Scott Bourne.

The micro four-thirds sensor format is enabling a new generation of cameras that combine compact size with DSLR-like features, such as interchangeable lenses. In this course, Rich Harrington and Scott Bourne introduce the micro four-thirds format, detailing its strengths and weaknesses for both photography and video, offering buying advice, and sharing tips for getting the best results when shooting with a micro four-thirds camera.

This course was created and produced by Rich Harrington. We are honored to host this content in our library.

Topics include:

  • What is the micro four-thirds format?
  • Understanding the advantages and disadvantages of micro four-thirds
  • Choosing a micro four-thirds body
  • Choosing the best lens
  • Using image stabilization
  • Shooting video with a micro four-thirds camera
  • Improving your audio


Start a 7-day free trial to lynda.com 
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Mastering Exposure, HDR, and Meet The New Team — Photofocus Podcast 9/5/13

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Rich Harrington has two great guests on the Photofocus podcast this week.
First up, a return from Panoramic, Landscape, and HDR guru
Ron Pepper.  We explore myths about HDR, killer techniques, and advanced controls.  No matter what your style of shooting or subject matter, you’ll learn a ton.

You’ll learn:
  • A complete understanding of exposure
  • Bracketing tips for capturing any scene
  • How to master exposure
  • Shooting HDR handheld
  • How to remove Ghosting objects and deal with moving subjects
  • How to work within the limitations of your camera
  • How many shots to take for  the best HDR
  • Using Photomatix and Photoshop for HDR
You’ll also meet the new editor of Photofocus, Melissa Niu.  She’s got a true passion for showcasing the best folks in the photo industry.  You’ll hear Melissa on future shows and see her work on the website.
Disclaimer: This show presents several ideas and techniques that we hope help you.  These are just some ways of approaching the issues at hand.  Combine with your own skill for best results.
Download  — http://photofocuspodcast.libsyn.com/webpage
Hosted by Rich Harrington
Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes — http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photofocus/id512223214
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New Class on Time-lapse Photography


I love timelapse photography. And here's my new class all about the topic!
Get the class here – http://www.lynda.com/After-Effects-tutorials/Creating-Time-Lapse-Video/137903-2.html

Learn how to speed up time and create compelling visual effects with time-lapse photography. Join Rich Harrington in the field as he captures nature's patterns at Red Rock Canyon in southwestern Nevada, and shows how to frame your scene and choose the proper camera settings. He'll show you how to capture great images, whether you're using a DSLR camera and a motorized slider or just a smartphone you have handy. Then join him back in the studio to transform your still footage into a storytelling time-lapse video, using tools like Photoshop, Premiere Pro, and Final Cut Pro.
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Topics include:
  • What is time-lapse photography?
  • Why shoot with a still camera?
  • Choosing a frame size and frame rate
  • Using an internal or external intervalometer
  • Selecting a memory card
  • Tracking the sun's position
  • Deciding how long to shoot
  • Using a slider
  • Shooting time lapse on a smartphone or tablet
  • Removing noise and spots with Adobe Camera Raw
  • Importing the image sequence
  • Refining the duration and frame rate
  • Blending frames
  • Creating variable speed effects
  • Exporting your sequence

  • Timelapes3
Get the class here – http://www.lynda.com/After-Effects-tutorials/Creating-Time-Lapse-Video/137903-2.html

Start a 7-day free trial to lynda.com 
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Stable Shots with a Micro Four-Thirds Camera

Let me show you how to stabilize a Micro Four-Thirds camera.  For some of the cameras, the stabilization is part of the camera and not the lens.
You can check out the whole class 
here and get a free trial membership here.
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How are Micro Four-Thirds Cameras Different?

MFT - How Micro Four-Thirds Differs from DSLR from RHED Pixel on Vimeo.

Let me show you how to stabilize a Micro Four-Thirds camera.  For some of the cameras, the stabilization is part of the camera and not the lens.
You can check out the whole class 
here and get a free trial membership here.
Comments

New Class on Panoramic Photography


I am super passionate about panoramic photography. And here's my new class all about the topic!


    Do not let another breathtaking scene go undocumented. Learn how to capture wide landscapes using panoramic shooting techniques, whether you're using an iPhone or a professional DSLR. Rich Harrington explains general panoramic concepts, like field of view and nodal point, and then describes the technical details for getting great original shots: how to properly mount the camera on a tripod, how to overlap each shot, which lenses deliver best results, and more. Next, learn about optional hardware like the GigaPan system and sliders, and a variety of mobile apps for capturing 360 panoramas. Finally, come back into the studio to learn how to process the photos in Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom, and Camera Raw.

    Topics include:
    • Choosing your gear
    • Compensating for the nodal point
    • Stitching in camera
    • Leveling the camera platform
    • Locking exposure and focus
    • Shooting with the GigaPan system
    • Shooting HDR panoramas
    • Shooting with an iPhone
    • Managing data from a panorama shoot
    • Reducing noise and removing dust with Camera Raw
    • Initiating the Photomerge command
    • Blending the photos
    • Refining highlights and shadows
    • Saving panoramas for print and the web
      Start a 7-day free trial to lynda.com 
      Comments

      Master the Magic Wand Tool in Photoshop


      Trying to make a selection in your photo? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to use the Magic Wand Tool in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Selecting color with the Color Range Command in Photoshop


      A Photoshop tutorial describing how to use the Color Range command to select a portion of your image based on color. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Photoshop-tutori... This specific tutorial is just a single movie from chapter five of the Practical Photoshop Selections course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete Photoshop course has a total duration of 1 hour and 8 minutes, and discusses the importance of making precise selections with the right tools, whether you are masking, or making basic tone adjustments.

      Start a 7-day free trial to lynda.com 
      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast with Special Guest Robert OToole

      Don't miss this podcast with wildlife photographer Robert OToole.

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      Rich Harrington has a special guest this week.  Robert OToole joins us to discuss his migration from commercial photographer to world-renowned nature photographer. Robert was the co-leader for our Alaska trip this year and a fantastic photographer and instructor.
      Robert O’Toole is an award-winning professional photographer. He was named American Bald Eagle Foundation “Photographer of the Year” in 2008. His vertical banking Bald Eagle image was awarded highly commended in the 2006 BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.
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      Rich and Robert discuss:

      • His move into nature photography
      • How to practice wildlife photography in your own neighborhood
      • Strategies for photographing nature
      • What makes a great image
      • Where to position the sun when shooting outdoors for the best light
      • The best times of day to shoot outdoors
      • Why Robert loves snow and eagles
      • The role of postprocessing and nature photography
      • The best camera settings for outdoor shooting to preserve highlights and exposure
      • Why he shoots manual 90% of the time
      • His favorite plugins for nature and landscape work
      • How to use your back focus button
      • How tracking sensitivity impacts your shots
      • Where you can travel with Robert for workshops

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      Download  — http://photofocuspodcast.libsyn.com/webpage
      Hosted by Rich Harrington
      Follow Robert on
      Twitter and read his blog
      Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes — http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photofocus/id512223214

      Comments

      Essential Apps for Site Surveys

      Explore how apps on mobile devices can help you get the most out of a photo or video shoot. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Photography-Vide.... This tutorial is a single movie from the Effective Site Surveys for Video and Photo Projects course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course duration is 1 hour and 34 minutes long and introduces creative professionals to the core concepts of location scouting for video and photo projects.

      Start a 7-day free trial to lynda.com 
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      Photoshop's Healing Brush


      Is there an object in your image you would like to fix? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to utilize the Healing Brush in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Creating a Hand-Tinted Look for a Photo


      Do you want to add tint to your photo? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to create a hand-tinted look in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast with Special Guest Jeff Revell

      In case you missed the new Photofocus podcast…. Jeff is one of my favorite photo educators.

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      Rich Harrington has a special guest on this week’s show. We catch up with best-selling author Jeff Revell, creator of the Snapshots to Great Shots series. Jeff is specializes in travel, landscape, urban, and nature photography.
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      Rich and Jeff discuss:
      • What matters most when buying a new camera.
      • What are the coolest new features to show up the latest crop of cameras.
      • What is photowalking and why you should get involved.
      • Jeff’s favorite places to learn photography
      • Practical advice for photographers
      • Where to find Jeff.

      Disclaimer: This show presents several ideas and techniques that we hope help you.  These are just some ways of approaching the issues at hand.  Combine with your own skill for best results.
      Download  — http://photofocuspodcast.libsyn.com/webpage
      Hosted by Rich Harrington
      Circle Jeff on Google+.
      Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes 
      Comments

      Free Transform Command in Photoshop


      Do you want to modify the shape of a layer? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to use the Free Transform Command in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      New Raw Support for Mac Users

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      If you’re a Mac user, two new camera updates have recently shipped. OS X Mountain Lion provides system-level support for digital camera RAW formats.  In order to use these files, you can access them through Aperture or iPhoto on your Mac.  You can also browse at the system level looking through folders.
      Supported by Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 4.07* 
      • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-G6
      • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF6
      • Sony Alpha SLT-A58

      Supported by Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 4.06*
      • Canon EOS-1D C
      • Canon EOS Rebel SL1 / 100D / Kiss X7
      • Canon EOS Rebel T5i / 700D / Kiss X7i
      • Hasselblad Lunar
      • Nikon COOLPIX A
      • Nikon D7100
      • Nikon 1 J3
      • Nikon 1 S1
      • Sony Alpha NEX-3N

      You can find out about other recently added cameras that work on your Mac here – http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5371?viewlocale=en_US&locale=en_US
      Note: To install Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Updates, you may need certain versions of Aperture or iPhoto already installed on your Mac.
      For more photo news, visit
      Photofocus ever day.
      Comments

      Content Aware: Fill, Scale & Heal


      Want to easily repair or change your image? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to utilize Content Aware in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast with Special Guests Dave Wilson and Gerard Murphy

      In case you missed the new Photofocus podcast…. Gerard is a Lightroom expert. Dave makes beautiful high dynamic range photos.

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      Rich Harrington has two special guests on this week’s show. We’re joined by Dave Wilson, a freelance art photographer from Texas. Dave shares his approach to getting the best shot (no matter how many exposures it takes). Dave is a native of Scotland  who likes to photograph subjects, scenes, locations and objects which symbolize Texas, the American Southwest and the United States in general.
      In the second half of the show we catch up with Lightroom expert 
      Gerard Murphy. Gerard has had a passion for photography since borrowing his Mom’s Pentax while on family vacations. He is also one of the inventors of Mosaic which helps photographers organize and backup their Lightroom catalogs.

      Rich and Dave discuss:
      • How Dave got into photography
      • How he balances his art career while having a second job
      • Why Dave loves HDR
      • Dave’s Favorite shooting techniques
      • How to create stunning black and white photos
      • How to determine the number of brackets to shoot for a HDR photo
      • When to use a fisheye lens
      • How to spot and fix chromatic aberration
      • Can you “fix” an image too much?
      • Selling strategies to help photographers make money
      • Developing multiple versions of a file
      • What is “Clown Vomit?”
      • Shooting with ND filters for long exposures

      Rich and Gerard discuss:
      • The most important features added to Lightroom 5
      • What’s missing from Lightroom and needs to be added
      • When to work in Lightroom vs.  Photoshop
      • How search can be used (and improved)

      Download  — http://photofocuspodcast.libsyn.com/webpage
      Hosted by Rich Harrington
      Circle Jeff on Google+.
      Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes 
      Comments

      Shooting under bright lighting conditions: DSLR Video Tips

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      On this week’s episode of DSLR Video Tips, we look at techniques to control exposure and depth of field when shooting under bright light conditions. Outdoor lighting can be too much for a camera, so it’s important to master the exposure triangle—the critical relationship between shutter speed, aperture, and film speed (ISO). Join us as we head back out on a real-world music video shoot for musician Jason Masi, and discuss ways to achieve total control over your focus and exposure when natural lighting is in abundance:

      • Use a neutral density (ND) filter to knock down exposure.
      • Use a loupe to magnify the image on your camera’s LCD screen and knock out stray light, making it much easier to achieve critical focus and exposure.
      • Use a variable ND filter to dial in the perfect exposure.
      • Use a matte box to hold filters and block lens flares.
      Check out this episode so you’ll be ready for your next production. Remember, each week’s episode is free for seven days, so tell all your video and photography friends to watch.
      Watch the entire DSLR Video Tips Series
      Comments

      Black and White Adjustment Layers in Photos


      Are you trying to change the mode of your image? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to convert your image mode in Photoshop CS6.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Using Photoshop's Refine Edge command


      A Photoshop tutorial exploring how to use the Refine Edge command to select a complex object such as hair. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Photoshop-tutori...
      This specific tutorial is just a single movie from chapter four of the Practical Photoshop Selections course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete Photoshop course has a total duration of 1 hour and 8 minutes, and discusses the importance of making precise selections with the right tools, whether you are masking, or making basic tone adjustments
      Start a 7-day free trial to lynda.com 
      Comments

      How to Merge Handheld Panoramic Photos

      Adaptive Wide Angle Panos from Photofocus Video Channel on Vimeo.

      Learn how to merge handheld panos and remove all distortion from the shot with Adobe Photoshop. The Photomerge feature in Photoshop is very forgiving of uneven shots, varying overlap, and even exposure changes. This feature works with almost any version of Photoshop you’ll find installed today.
      Check out Photofocus for more photo news and inspiration.
      Comments

      Shooting Without A Tripod – The Leaning Bow and Arrow

      statues

      Olympus OM‑D E‑M5 with Sigma 30mm Lens ƒ 2.8 | 1/13 second | EV -1.0 | ISO 640

      I was shooting inside a museum with very little light and a no tripod rule.  The results are above.
      For this technique, I used both my gear and environment to stabilize a shot in VERY low light. I was also running on 2 hours of sleep after just getting off the airplane.

      • Find a pole or wall to lean against to brace your body.
      • Using your camera strap, create a reasonable amount of tension by stretching the camera body between your two arms.  You can also just leave the strap around your neck and pull, but this reduces the number of angles you can achieve.
      • Use the Live View panel on the camera to frame the shot.
      • Exhale your breath, (don’t hold it – which causes shake).
      • Fire the shots. Consider using a burst mode to get multiple photos or even brackets so you have a few options in post.

      bowarrow
      Overall I’m happy with the results.  A tripod would of course been ideal, but there are plenty of times you’re not allowed to use one when shooting.
      Check out Photofocus for more photo news and inspiration.

      Comments

      Adaptive Wide Angle Controls in Adobe Photoshop


      Do you want to adjust the angle of your image? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to utilize the adaptive wide angle controls in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Punching in on LiveView: DSLR Video Tips

      P5161654-500x375
      On this week’s episode of
      DSLR Video Tips, we look at a key aspect of getting great-looking shots: critical focus. Join us as we head back out on a real-world music video shoot for musician Jason Masi, and discuss time-saving techniques for achieving critical focus:

      • “Punch in” on a shot in LiveView mode to achieve sharp focus.
      • Use a loupe or viewfinder to magnify the image on your camera’s LCD screen, making it much easier to achieve critical focus.
      • Use autofocus to quickly lock in focus prior to recording.
      • Take a look at the benefits of using a field monitor, as well as an electronic viewfinder, to aid in focus. A bigger or higher resolution screen can be a huge help in getting sharp focus.
      • Adjust aperture to help locking focus.


      Achieving critical focus is essential to creating beautiful shots. Check out this episode so you’ll be ready for your next production.


      Remember, each week’s episode is free for seven days–so tell all your video and photography friends to check it out.

      Interested in more?

      Comments

      I Just Wrapped a New Class on Photography

      startedwithstrobes
      I just sat down on the couch after two intense days. My good friend Abba Shapiro and I finished shooting a new class for Lynda.com called "Up and Running with Studio Strobes" to help photographers. It's an introductory course to help beginner and intermediate photographers select and setup a strobe lighting setup for use in a studio or a remote location.

      Here's the Table of Contents.

      1.0 Why Shoot with Strobes?
      2.0 Why Shoot with Continuous Lights (Instead of Strobes)
      3.0 Buying a Lighting Set-up
      4.0 The Components of a Studio Strobe Kit
      5.0 Getting to know your lights
      6.0 Triggering a Light
      7.0 Setting and Testing Your Strobes
      8.0 Modifying Strobe Lights
      9.0 Setting up your Lights Effectively
      10.0 Postproduction (Bonus Lessons)

      While you're waiting for new things to come out… check out some of my other classes.
      Comments

      An Insider’s Look at Adobe Photoshop with Guest Bryan O’Neil Hughes

      bryan-big

      Rich Harrington has a very special guest on this week’s show. We’re joined by Bryan O’Neil Hughes from Adobe.  He’s the Senior Product Manager for Adobe Photoshop and works on many of the projects that Adobe builds for photographers.  What many don’t know is that Bryan has an extensive career in photography as well and that he’s written a handful of books and authored courses to share his love of photography and photo restoration.
      This week show answers a ton of questions about how Photoshop gets made.  You’ll learn how Adobe creates dramatic advances that benefit photographers worldwide.
      Rich and Bryan discuss:

      • How features in Photoshop are designed and built
      • What are the most useful ways to make a selection in Photoshop
      • The new mantra – save time and get better results
      • Why there are so many “magic” tools
      • How new users can better learn photoshop?
      • Breathing new life into old commands and making the application better
      • Why and when do features get cut
      • Tips for editing black and white photos with Lightroom and Photoshop
      • Working with bracketed photos and 32-bit images in Adobe Camera Raw
      • How many content aware tools are there?
      • Content aware tips and tricks
      • How do remove lens flares using content aware fills
      • What is the adaptation setting in the content aware commands
      • How do Creative Cloud updates affect subscribers
      • How Photoshop and Lightroom are complimentary
      • What are some of the best features that people seem to miss
      • How to selectively sharpen your photos
      • Using Camera Raw with TIFF and JPEG files
      • How to remove lens distortion from all photos (even those from a phone)

      Download  — http://photofocuspodcast.libsyn.com/webpage
      Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes —
       http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photofocus/id512223214

      Comments

      Are You a Control Freak? Run Camera Raw as a Filter

      Run Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop from Photofocus Video Channel on Vimeo.


      Ever wanted to use some of those great camera raw adjustments like Clarity or Post Crop Vignette on any image? With Photoshop CC you can now use Adobe Camera Raw as a filter which opens new creative options. Give me :30 seconds to show you and I’ll unlock new control in your post workflow.
      Check out Photofocus for more photo news and inspiration.
      Comments

      Setting a Custom White Balance

      klevinsamples
      While White Balance presets and Auto White Balance can be quite useful, many choose to manually set the white balance on their cameras.  This is a useful approach if you need to compensate for when multiple lighting sources are mixed together in the same scene.  It is also a way to warm or cool a shot for stylistic purposes.

      scale
      If you want to work numerically, you can use these numbers in degrees Kelvin as a guide.

      • 1,700K Match flame
      • 1,850K Candle flame
      • 2,700–3,300K Incandescent lightbulb
      • 3,400K Studio lamps
      • 4,100K Moonlight
      • 5,000K Horizon daylight
      • 5,500–6,000K Typical daylight, electronic flash
      • 6,500K Daylight, overcast

      If memorizing a bunch of temperatures is too difficult or you aren’t happy with a built-in preset, it’s time to make your own preset. The exact process will vary from camera to camera, but typically the process involves doing the following.
      1. Shoot a reference photo with something white in the shot.  The white should fill most of the frame.
      2. The subject can be a sheet of paper or a more accurate calibration target.
      3. Choose the custom white balance option in your camera’s menu.
      4. Select the reference image so the camera can calibrate itself.
      5. Take a few more photos under the lighting conditions used to make the preset.
      6. Visually inspect the preset’s result and ensure that skin tones and key details in the shot look natural.

      Here’s a short video tutorial showing the process.

      DP BestFlow - Manually White-Balancing a Camera from ASMP dpBestflow on Vimeo.


      Check out
      Photofocus for more photo news and inspiration.

      Comments

      DSLR tutorial : Calculating the Sun's Position


      A key factor to keep in mind when shooting outdoors is the position of the sun. In this tutorial find out how to calculate the sun's position in order to plan for your shoot. Find out more about the app here for iTunes and here for Android.

      Interested in more?

      Comments

      Importing Images with Adobe Bridge


      Are you trying to import your images from your camera? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to utilize Adobe Bridge to import your photos.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      A Complete HDR Workflow

      subtle_hdr

      I’ve put together a complete lesson on creating High Dynamic Range panoramic photos.  This video tutorial walks you through a few different tools to try out.
      I’ll show you how to:

      • Organize multiple HDR photos
      • Use Photoshop’s built-in toolset
      • Use Adobe Camera Raw to pre-process raw files before the merge
      • Align images and reduce noise and ghosting
      • Create a batch process with Photomatix
      • Enhance images with tone maps and fusion
      • Browse preset looks to find a good starting point
      • Choose the right bit depth
      • Repair white balance issues
      • Stitch the panoramic photo with Photomerge
      • Enhance with a Curves adjustment
      • Crop to a finished size
      • Fill in gaps in the photo

      Check out Photofocus for more photo news and inspiration.

      Comments

      Using the Right White Balance Preset

      The White Balance setting on your camera is one of the most important choices to make. This control can be used to neutralize any color cast in an image and to set the overall color (or tone) for the scene. White is most often used as a reference point because it is the perfect blend of all the color channels.

      While many are perfectly content to shoot in an Auto White Balance setting… this can lead to extra work in post.  Changes in lighting conditions (such as clouds passing overhead) can create variations in skin tones or subjects that just end up being frustrating. Ideally, strongly consider setting your white balance correctly before shooting in a location.  If shooting raw, you have greater flexibility to compensate in post.

      white_balance

      The presets for your camera may vary slightly depending on the model and manufacturer. However, they’re usually easy to understand when you think about them. Typically, the presets are named for the type of lighting they are designed to work best with.
      • Daylight or Direct Sunlight. This option works best for general shooting under daylight conditions where the sun is readily visible.
      • Shade. This option is used when shooting in sunlight and your subjects are in the shade. It tends to make the image more orange to compensate for the bluish tones of the shaded areas.
      • Cloudy. This setting is similar to daylight but compensates for the sky having some cloud cover (which cools down the color temperature). Many prefer this setting because it is a little warmer.
      • Tungsten or Incandescent. This white balance setting is designed for shooting indoors with standard lightbulb illumination.
      • Fluorescent. This setting works best when shooting under standard fluorescent tube lights. However, some lights are daylight balanced, which would require you to switch to the daylight setting.
      • Flash. This option is designed to be color balanced for your camera’s flash. You won’t use this option when shooting video because you can’t use a flash.
      Be sure to experiment with your settings as well as apply your own judgement to get the best results.

      Check out Photofocus for more photo news and inspiration.
      Comments

      Using the Mixer Brush in Adobe Photoshop


      Do you want to give your image a painterly feel? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he shows how to utilize the Mixer Brush in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      How to Remove Distortion From Wide Angle Photos

      Adaptive Wide Angle Command from Photofocus Video Channel on Vimeo.


      If you shoot architecture or panoramas, you’ll often shoot wide angle.  This can lead to an unwanted fisheye effect.  Whether you’re shooting one exposure or stitching several, fixing the problem is stone cold simple.  Learn how to use the Adaptive Wide Angle command in Photoshop to repair perspective issues in your photos. This is a fast and easy way to get better landscapes and architectural shots.

      Give me 2 minutes and I'll give you better looking photos.

      Check out Photofocus for more photo news and inspiration.
      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast with Ron Pepper and Skip Cohen

      Rich Harrington has two special guests on this week’s show.  First up is Ron Pepper of Panorama Network.  We explore all aspects of panorama shooting, stitching, and HDR.  If you want to shoot wider photos and capture great details, don’t miss this interview. In fact the tips discussed will help many styles of photography.
      Rich and Ron discuss:
      • The challenges of 360˚ panoramic photography
      • Why you should shooting panos in RAW
      • Using the in-camera tools to decide how to shoot a photo
      • Tips on finding proper exposure
      • Workflow tips for postproduction
      • How to remove chromatic aberration
      • Which order should you stitch and merge  HDR panoramas
      • Methods when working with Photomatix Pro

      In the second half of the show we catch up with Skip Cohen.  Skip talks about the upcoming Skip Cohen University conference.Learn from the best instructors in the business
      • Skip’s summer school schedule
      • What an attendee can expect

      Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes — http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photofocus/id512223214
      Comments

      Removing Noise in a Raw File


      Do you have noise in your camera raw file? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he shows how to remove noise in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Want great shots? Make sure you have at least one prime lens

      primelenses_why2
      When you bought your first DSLR, it likely came with a zoom lens. This style of lens makes it easy to get a wider range of coverage with just a quick turn of the wrist. Many prefer this flexibility versus having to actually move their feet to get the shot.

      So why go “old school” and choose a prime lens that only offers a single focal length? It’s all about
      aperture. Here are a few reasons to consider.

      • Most prime lenses offer apertures that open as far f/1.2 to f/2. These wider opening can let in more light to hit the camera’s sensor.
      • More light can be truly useful when shooting in existing light or low-light environments. It means you can use lower ISO settings to control noise or combine with higher ISO settings to get sharper photos due to faster shutter speeds.
      • Prime lenses are typically sharper than zoom lenses.
      • Prime lenses tend to be cheaper and lighter than zoom lenses. This is because they have fewer moving parts and elements.
      • If you want a shallow depth of field to blur the background, prime lenses make this task much easier.


      lonely
      Shot at ƒ2.0 — The shallow depth of field keeps the viewer focussed on the emotional details of the photo.
      Image ©Richard Harrington

      A great place to start for most users is a 50 mm lens. The “nifty fifty” can often be found for as low as $150. Sure you can spend more to get a 1.2 aperture… but for those looking to get started, the 1.8 aperture is a great place to begin.

      Check out Photofocus for more photo news and inspiration.

      Comments

      Localized Adjustments in Camera Raw


      Are you trying to make a selection in a camera raw image? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to make localized adjustments in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Mastering the Camera Raw Interface


      Are you trying to open a camera raw image? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he explains the camera raw interface in Adobe Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Puppet Warp in Adobe Photoshop


      Are you trying to transform an object in your photo? Join Instructor Richard Harrington as he demonstrates how to puppet warp in Photoshop.

      Be sure to also check out the book and video training bundle —
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals
      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Summer Fun — Photofocus Podcast



      Join Rich and Scott as they talk about a bunch of summer oriented photo topics.  Get ready for shooting great pictures this summer with this potluck of photo wisdom.
      Rich and Scott discuss:
      • Summer travel  and photography season
      • Favorite places to shoot
      • Travel Guide Resources
      • How much to pack for a road trip
      • Assigning a personal project for the day shooting
      • When to buy a new camera
      • The FUJI X100S
      • Mannypacks
      • Where to Buy New and Used Lenses
      • What to look for when buying a used lens
      • Do you need model and talent releases
      • Apps for model releases
      • Do you need Location releases
      • Shooting in National Parks
      • The benefit of looking like a tourist when shooting photos

      Download  — http://photofocuspodcast.libsyn.com/webpage
      Hosted by Rich Harrington & Scott Bourne
      Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes —
       http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photofocus/id512223214
      Comments

      Real World Photoshop Workflow Example

      statues

      In this video for TipSquirrel.com, I show my workflow Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop. I transform an image to remove the imperfections caused by lowlight shooting.


      You can see how this image was shot by reading Shooting Without A Tripod – The Leaning Bow and Arrow at Photofocus.

      Comments

      Building a GigaPan

      Panoramic Photography - Building a GigaPan from RHED Pixel on Vimeo.


      See how to setup the GigaPan system with your camera. Learn how to connect the camera and tether it for control.

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Making a Dramatic Vignette

      Advanced Vignettes in Photoshop from Photofocus Video Channel on Vimeo.


      Vignettes help control where the viewer focusses in your picture. Using Adobe Photoshop, you can create truly impressive vignettes. Try the Iris Blur effect to create de-focussed edges as well as an alpha channel. Toss on an exposure adjustment and a layer mask and you have the perfect vignette.

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      What is a GigaPan?

      Panoramic Photography - What Is a GigaPan? from RHED Pixel on Vimeo.


      Learn what the GigaPan system is and why people choose to use it. We’ll complete the initial setup of the platform and create a level shooting area. I’m helped by Photofocus contributor Levi Sim.

      For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Fixing Nighttime Time-lapse

      Fixing Nighttime Time-lapse from RHED Pixel on Vimeo.

      Sometimes when shooting time-lapse at night you'll get unwanted reflections. In this tutorial you'll learn how to make selective adjustments to fix problem areas. For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      Using a Video Calibration Target

      I show you how to make sure your DSLR footage is in focus by using a video calibration target. From the extensive DPBestflow site I highly recommend.
      Comments

      Better Keying From Production to Post — Watch the Free Webinar


      Here is a recording from the Tiffen Webinar I did.

      Greenscreen has become an essential tool in modern video, film, and photo workflows. To succeed, it needs to be the perfect combination of production and post. This webinar features visual FX industry veteran Marco Paolini and Motion Graphic Designer and Editor, Rich Harrington. You'll learn how to shoot footage and photos to produce better keying footage (particularly the need for quality lighting) as well as on-set advice to follow. With Digital Film Tool software products, you'll learn how to use additional tools for those times when you need a key, but there's no greenscreen to be found. This workshop will teach you techniques that work with any post workflow and also gives you a quick start on successfully keying with zMatte.

      You can download a free 15-day trial here: http://www.tiffensoftware.com/products/dfxv3-free-trial-download/dfx-v3-free-trial-downloads

      Take 30% off with this unique code:
      RHEDDFX13
      It can be redeemed here:
      http://tiffensoftware.com/promos

      Comments

      Near NYC? Check out this Free Event at Adorama

      AdoramaTV, host Diane Wallace invites you to a very exciting event - the 3rd annual Adorama Street Fair, called Sunday Family Fun Day, in support of the Boomer Esiason Foundation to fight Cystic Fibrosis. The event is free and and fun for the entire family. Last year's festival attracted more than 20,000 attendees.

      Sunday Family Fun Day will be held on Sunday, June 23rd from 10am to 4pm on 18th street between 5th and 6th Avenue in New York City. Taking place right out front of the Adorama store, you can participate in fun games and activities. There will also be a live petting zoo as well as food and beverages. Come inside and explore the Adorama store and you will be sure to find a plethora of discounts and you will have the opportunity to speak in person with some of the industries top camera and electronic brands including: Canon, Nikon, Sony, Panasonic and Adobe. Visit the Adorama outdoor Learning Center tent and take advantage of the free photography clinics. Additional highlights include, celebrity appearances, prizes and raffles.
      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast with Olympic Photographer Dave Black

      Join Rich and Scott as they discuss the recent decision by the Chicago Sun Times to lay off their entire photography staff.  They made the decision to train their reporting staff to shoot with iPhones and to focus more on video.  Rich and Scott analyze what this means to the photo community.

      The second half of the show will inspire you as we hear from
      Dave Black.  Dave is a freelance photographer for over 30 years.  His   work has primarily centered on the sports industry for such publications as Sports Illustrated, Time, Newsweek and the award-winning TV show Sports Century on ESPN. He’s covered events like the Masters, Kentucky Derby, National Football League, NASCAR and extensive work regarding the United States Olympic Committee, Olympic athletes and coverage of twelve Olympic Games.

      Rich and Dave discuss:
      • How Dave broke int sports photography
      • What is it like working in the field and at sporting events
      • How Dave prepares for a sports shoot by studying the sport and the athletes
      • Practical advice for shooting indoor and outdoor sporting events
      • How Dave got into the Olympics
      • Advice about Light Painting
      • Where to Find Dave — Check out his blog: http://www.daveblackphotography.com

      Download  — http://photofocuspodcast.libsyn.com/webpage
      Hosted by Rich Harrington & Scott Bourne
      Please post a review for the Podcast on iTunes —
       http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photofocus/id512223214
      Comments

      How to Properly Use A Tripod

      tripod A lot of you have likely invested in a tripod… that’s the good news. Now let’s make sure you’re getting the most benefit from using it. Here are a few practical tips to get the results you want.
      • Find a level space. When you set your tripod up, look for a level space. This means less vibrations caused by legs jutting out at awkward angles. If possible, try to avoid spaces prone to a lot of vibration (such as metal platforms or wooden floors in high traffic areas). In fact a surface that’s a little softer (like a grassy field or dirt road) may be ideal.
      • Go low if possible. Depending on the shot you want to make, keep your tripod as close to the ground as possible. This minimizes the potential effects of wind and vibration. Try spreading the legs a little wider. You can go too far and make the whole thing unstable, but remember that a fat pyramid will be more stable than a thin one. It also reduces the chance of the gear tipping over and falling.
      • Don’t use the center column. Less extension always means greater stability. At all costs, try to avoid raising your tripod’s center column. This actually destabilizes the tripod. If you need more height, try moving to higher ground. Can you lower your body instead? Can you try a different angle? Don’t shoot the world from eye level all of the time. If you’re tall, consider a tripod that has longer legs.
      Head over to Photofocus, my Photography blog for the rest of the article. http://photofocus.com/2013/06/01/how-to-use-a-tripod-the-right-way-2/
      Comments

      Manually White-Balancing a Camera

      DP BestFlow - Manually White-Balancing a Camera from ASMP dpBestflow on Vimeo.

      I show you how to get the proper white balance on your DSLR camera. From the extensive DPBestflow site I highly recommend. For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.
      Comments

      A View From the Desert


      Powered by Piqsure



      One of my images from my new Lynda class

      Comments

      Photofocus Interview about Lightroom 5 Public Beta with the Adobe Product Manager


      NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE: The Photofocus Podcast Feed HAS CHANGED!
      Here is the new feed: 
      feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Download episode here...   or get it on iTunes

      Rich takes a deep dive with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom product manager Sharad Mangalick.
      Topics include:

      Connect with Adobe on social media:
      Hosted by Rich Harrington
      _______
       
      This Post Sponsored by:
      lynda.com Learn photography anytime, anywhere, and at your own pace—from bite-sized tutorials to comprehensive courses. Try lynda.com free for 10 days by visiting lynda.com/ Photofocus.
      The HDR Learning Center Check out new ways to use High Dynamic Range photography to make compelling images.  Free tutorials and posts to get results. Produced in partnership with HDR Soft.
      The Topaz Labs Image Enhancement bundle. Open up a world of creative possibilities with a seamless, integrated workflow. You don't need to be a Photoshop wizard to look like one. Click here and use the code photofocus to get a 15% discount.
      Gigapan.com. The revolutionary GigaPan EPIC robotic camera mount lets you capture and combine thousands of images into one incredible, interactive panorama. Save 10% with the code PHOTOFOCUS.
      Drobo - Not only is Drobo 5D fast, but it’s easy-to-use, expandable, flexible, and protected.
      Comments

      A New Photo and Tutorial


      I hope you enjoy this new HDR shot from Alaska.
      Comments

      The New Radial Filter in Lightroom 5

      I'd like to share a few things from Adobe about the new Photoshop Lightroom Public Beta
      Radial Filter

      Busy backgrounds or bright colors can distract viewers from the focal point of an image. Photographers may try to reduce the distraction by cropping an image, but this can result in the loss of interesting detail and balance. Another approach to focusing the viewer’s attention is to create a vignette effect, but this only works if a subject is in the center of an image.
      The Radial Gradient tool in Lightroom 5 now offers photographers more flexibility and control in how they guide a viewer’s eye to emphasize the important parts of an image. Using this tool, photographers can create off-center vignette effects or multiple vignette areas in a single image. This local adjustment control lets photographers minimize distractions and focus a viewer’s attention exactly where it should be.
      Get the free public beta here
      Comments

      My Photoshop World Schedule




      Wednesday

      • 1:00 pm—6:00 pm | Show Floor & Drobo Booth


      Thursday

      • 10:45 am—11:45 am | PHOTOSHOP 101 | General Photoshop
      • 12:00 pm—1:00 pm | USING DIGITAL PUBLISHING TO DISTRIBUTE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY & EXTEND YOUR BRAND
      • 1:30 pm—5:00 pm | Show Floor & Drobo Booth


      Friday

      • 9:30 am—10:30 am | COLOR CORRECTING VIDEO FOOTAGE
      • 11:00 am—12:00 pm | EDITING VIDEO IN PHOTOSHOP
      • 12:00 pm—1:00 pm | Show Floor & Drobo Booth

      Comments

      A Few Of My Piqsures as Interactive Objects

      A company that I've been working with is Piqsure. They are about to roll out their public beta to allow people to post their images in cool new ways (including high-resolution viewing on blogs and social media).

      Comments welcome.

      Neil Armstrong's Space Suit


      Powered by Piqsure



      Valley of Fire Panoramic


      Powered by Piqsure



      Rapunzel at Rest


      Powered by Piqsure



      Young Woman in Israel


      Powered by Piqsure

      Comments

      Photofocus podcast April 5 — "Live" from Alaska

      photofocuslogo

      Here is the new feed: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast
      Download episode here…   or get it on iTunes

      Rich and Scott record a special podcast live from Alaska.  They breakdown how they get ready for a professional shoot.
      Topics include:
      • What gear to bring and what to leave
      • How to get gear on location
      • How to get the shot by setting objectives
      • Using multiple camera bodies
      • Scott’s Eagle shot he’s still trying to get
      • Pre-visualization strategies
      • What makes a great photo
      • How to photograph birds
      • What is the best depth of field for action?
      • Plus the announcement of our new HDR Learning Center


      Download the episode here…
      Hosted by Rich Harrington & Scott Bourne
      Comments

      Win a Drobo from Me Plus New Tutorials

      windroboptc


      Thanks to the folks at Drobo… I have one to give away each month.

      These are the same drives that I run both my office (
      RHED Pixel) on as well as my home studio.

      You can
      enter the contest over at the Power To Create site.

      Plus you can check out some great tutorials like


      Head over to
      The Power to Create site.

      Comments

      Accidentally Reformatted a Memory Card and Need to Get Your Pictures Back? There’s an App for That

      klix_splash

      It hasn’t happened to me in a LONG time, but I did get asked the other day by a fellow photographer about recovering pictures from a memory card after an accidental reformat.  There’s a great tool that I’ve used int the past that can pull back photos from the grave called Klix.
      The following issues can be solved:
      • Deleted images
      • Reformatted memory cards
      • Corrupted memory cards (often cause by sudden loss of camera power)

      The tool works on all types of cards and can recover photos or video (as long as you haven’t written a file to that new place on a memory card). The following card types are supported. It really works well and I’ve used it to recover gigabytes of data with no hitches. The best thing is the try before you buy. You can download the demo and scan your cards… if the demo version sees the pictures it can recover them. File this away for that disaster moment when you realize you’ve blown away a picture (or even a whole shoot) accidentally.
      For $20 this is a good insurance policy… you can get more info or the trial
      here.

      For more photo news like this, check out
      Photofocus (my photo blog).
      Comments

      All About Tripods and Camera Support

      tripods

      Make sure you check out this episode of Photofocus.

      Rich and Scott record a special podcast live from Alaska.  They breakdown the gear they brought and share an in-depth look at camera support.

      Topics include:
      • Lightweight support including the Joby Gorillapod
      • Ultra-portable travel tripods
      • Using a slider
      • A High Hat for video shooting
      • Going with a solid set of legs
      • Why tripods are called sticks in the first place
      • Getting gear onto small airplanes
      • Practical advice for traveling with equipment
      • How to approach prepping for a shoot on the road

      Download the episode here…
      Hosted by Rich Harrington & Scott Bourne
      Comments

      Five Reasons That You Need an L-Plate

      l-plate
      I just posted this over at my photo blog — Photofocus. Be sure to visit there for daily news and inspiration about photography.

      I just upgraded and added an L-plate to my Olympus OM-D camera… I’d previously used L-plates on my DSLRs, but this is a first for my Micro Four Thirds camera.
      • A Stable Platform — The L-plate lets you easily switch the camera from portrait to landscape in your tripod. As such the camera is always attached to the tripod head with its weight directly over the tripod column. There’s no flopping the camera into a notch slot and hanging it at an angle when you switch orientation. This means less vibration and less chance of the camera tipping over.
      • A Secure Connection — Because the plate connects with a hex nut, it’s in there. You have to use an actual Allen wrench to connect the plate. It won’t accidentally slide on you throughout the shooting day and you don’t need to worry about the camera coming loose.
      • Less Distortion — I got into L-plates because of panoramic photography. As you rotate the camera, keeping it centered over the column makes it a lot easier to get cleaner results. Each rotation keeps the camera centered and as you swing to encompass a wider view, the images overlap more cleanly and stitch together to make better panoramic photos.
      • Reduced Wear and Tear — I often attach camera straps to my L-plate. I also find that the plate itself provides additional protection from bumps and scratches (almost like body armor).
      • Interchangeability — The L-plate use a tongue and groove type connection that’s based on an Arca Swiss plate system. These makes it very easy to move from one tripod or mount to another. A system is just that, compatibility across all your gear.

      If you’re serious about getting the most stability from a tripod (particularly if you shoot stitched panoramics), invest in an L-plate.

      Comments

      Day One of My Eagle Photo Safari


      A collection of photos and video clips from Day One of my Eagle photo safari. My first time making images of these birds, but I wanted to share these magnificent creatures with you.

      Music: Sticky Bumps (featuring Debbizo) by spinningmerkaba
      Mentorship:
      Scott Bourne & Robert O'Toole
      Comments

      The Easiest Way to Shoot HDR Photography


      Join us this week, as we venture out to Great Fall National Park. Have you tried to photograph the beauty of a scene but just can't capture its intensity or range? In this episode, Host Richard Harrington and special guest, Abba Shapiro explore the world of HDR photography. You will learn the benefits for using High Dynamic Range photography to capture all your breathtaking moments.

      In this show you will learn:

      • The benefits of High Dynamic Range photography
      • The camera settings needed to achieve HDR photography
      • How to work with moving subjects when capturing HDR images
      • What gear you need to capture HDR Photography
      • The benefits for using a remote shutter release

      We will be back with an episode revealing the post process for HDR photography soon.
      Comments

      I Have a Free Time-lapse Workshop in New York City on 3/12


      canyon1

      I'll be teaching a free workshop in New York City on Time-lapse Photography (sponsored by Drobo).
      Getting Started with Time-lapse Photography and Keeping Those Thousands of Images Safe Sponsored by Drobo Tuesday, March 12, 2013 | 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
      Sign up here
      • Event Type: Photography, Software
      • Skill Level: Intermediate
      • Speakers: Richard Harrington

      Here's the official description of the event:
      DSLRs can produce amazing photos and video… but how about compelling video created from hundreds of still images? In this seminar you’ll learn how to create dynamic time-lapse video and use photographic techniques to achieve amazing dynamic range and super high resolution. Rich finds that time-lapse is a great creative outlet that almost any photographer can learn in just a few hours.
      You'll learn the whole process from shoot to post… with an emphasis on speed and practicality. You’ll learn how the addition of a simple intervalometer to your existing DSLR kit can open up all new creative outlets. No expensive gear to get started, just a clear path and streamlined workflow. You'll also learn Rich's data management approach from field to studio to keep all those images safe. Finally, put the images together with popular tools like Photoshop, Premiere Pro, or Final Cut Pro.

      Sign up here
      Comments

      Project Management Tutorial: Understanding Your Capabilities

      Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Video-tutorials/.... This tutorial shows how to analyze your business to know what you can complete in-house versus with contractors or vendors, and how to achieve a competitive advantage. This tutorial is a single movie from the Practical Project Management for Creative Projects course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington.

      • Introduction
      • 1. The "Whats" and "Whys" of Project Management
      • 2. Understanding Services Offered
      • 3. Project Management Core Concepts
      • 4. Scoping the Project
      • 5. Estimating Time
      • 6. Client Communication
      • 7. Project Control Cycle
      • 8. Managing Employees and Contractors
      • 9. Effective Teams
      • 10. Keeping Clients Happy
      • Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      Free Time-lapse Workshop in NYC

      StartedTimelapse

      Tuesday, March 12, 2013 | 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

      Event Type: Photography, Software
      Skill Level: Intermediate

      DSLRs can produce amazing photos and video… but how about compelling video created from hundreds of still images? In this seminar you’ll learn how to create dynamic time-lapse video and use photographic techniques to achieve amazing dynamic range and super high resolution. Rich finds that time-lapse is a great creative outlet that almost any photographer can learn in just a few hours.

      You'll learn the whole process from shoot to post… with an emphasis on speed and practicality. You’ll learn how the addition of a simple intervalometer to your existing DSLR kit can open up all new creative outlets. No expensive gear to get started, just a clear path and streamlined workflow. You'll also learn Rich's data management approach from field to studio to keep all those images safe. Finally, put the images together with popular tools like Photoshop, Premiere Pro, or Final Cut Pro.

      You can
      register for free here

      Comments

      Project Management Tutorial: Managing a Project with Facebook

      Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Video-tutorials/.... Discover how to use Facebook groups as a project management tool. This tutorial is a single movie from the Practical Project Management for Creative Projects course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington.

      • Introduction
      • 1. The "Whats" and "Whys" of Project Management
      • 2. Understanding Services Offered
      • 3. Project Management Core Concepts
      • 4. Scoping the Project
      • 5. Estimating Time
      • 6. Client Communication
      • 7. Project Control Cycle
      • 8. Managing Employees and Contractors
      • 9. Effective Teams
      • 10. Keeping Clients Happy
      • Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      Project Management Tutorial: The Characteristics of a Project


      Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Video-tutorials/.... Explore the characteristics of a project, including its purpose, constraints, interdependencies, and more. This tutorial is a single movie from the Practical Project Management for Creative Projects course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington.

      • Introduction
      • 1. The "Whats" and "Whys" of Project Management
      • 2. Understanding Services Offered
      • 3. Project Management Core Concepts
      • 4. Scoping the Project
      • 5. Estimating Time
      • 6. Client Communication
      • 7. Project Control Cycle
      • 8. Managing Employees and Contractors
      • 9. Effective Teams
      • 10. Keeping Clients Happy
      • Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      Essential Questions to Ask at the Start of a Project


      essentialquestions
      Through the years, we’ve learned many lessons the hard way. While every project is unique, it often seems the problems remain the same. Here are a few questions we always ask at the start of a project:

      • Who is our customer? Projects often have many parties involved. Know who you are responsible to keep happy.
      • What is the purpose? Establish what the video is trying to accomplish.
      • How will we measure success? Determine which factors will be used to judge the success of the project.
      • What do we want to say? Identify the goal of the piece and the message that the audience should walk away with.
      • What resources do we have? Decide who will be assigned to the project. Establish if there are any assets or resources available to the project that should be utilized.
      • What is the budget? Never discuss approach without having an idea of your financial constraints. Creative types often get swept up into big ideas without knowing what the project can support.
      • What are the deadlines? Equally as important as budget is schedule. You need to understand any major milestones so you can schedule work and adjust your approach to match the available time.
      • Are there any customer requirements? Never make assumptions. It’s always a good idea to ask the clients if they have any specific needs or requirements for the end product. You’ll often be surprised how important details can go unspoken until the very end of the project.

      Follow Me on
      Twitter or Facebook
      Comments

      New Camera? TIme to Update if You're a Mac User

      For more photo news, be sure to check out www.Photofocus.com.

      mlupdate

      If you’re using a Mac, you need to fire up the software update engine….  Apple Menu > Software Update.  There’s been a trio of recent Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Updates.
      Supported by Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 4.04*
      • Leica D-Lux 6
      • Leica V-Lux 4
      • Leica X2
      • Nikon D5200
      • Pentax K-5 II
      • Pentax K-5 IIs
      • Pentax K-30
      • Pentax Q
      • Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1

      Supported by Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 4.03*

      • Canon EOS 6D
      • Nikon 1 V2

      Supported by Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 4.02*

      • Nikon COOLPIX P7700
      • Olympus PEN E-PL5
      • Olympus PEN E-PM2
      • Olympus STYLUS XZ-2
      • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GH3
      • Sony Alpha NEX-5R
      • Sony Alpha NEX-6
      • Sony Alpha SLT-A99

      If the updates don’t show up, you’re either current… or need to install a newer version of Aperture or iPhoto.

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook
      Comments

      A Cool Travel Tripod

      Adorama Photography TV presents the Giottos VITRUVIAN Travel Tripod. This lightweight, 5-section aluminum tripod is meant for travel. If you are looking for a tripod that is small enough to fit into your suitcase and light enough not to weigh you down on trips, this one is for you.

      You will find that unfolding this compact tripod is quick and easy and the legs are very sturdy. Reaching a maximum height of 62" it only takes a few seconds to unlock the legs and fold it back down.

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook
      Comments

      Why Shoot HDR? I LOVE HDR — Free Copies of New Book

      TTLBAR

      Ipad_Promo_0004_Layer-Comp-5

      I just released a new book all about HDR Photography with my buddy Scott Bourne. If you would like to learn more about high dynamic range (HDR) photography, check out my new book for Apple iPad. It’s called “Secrets of HDR.” It’s only $2.99 and covers all the essentials. We’ve written this book with a simple goal. We want to share our love of “tasteful” HDR photography. While there are fans of extreme HDR, we prefer a more subtle approach. We couldn’t find any books on this more realistic approach to HDR so we wrote one!

      Free codes are sprinkled into this article. Redeem on the front page of the iTunes Store by cocking the Redeem link in upper right corner). A code can only be used once. First come, first served.



      From the intro...

      Why Shoot HDR?

      While it may seem like a silly question, there are actually several reasons to shoot HDR. We personally don’t ever shoot a landscape or a cityscape without also shooting it in HDR. It solves so many problems and it’s better safe than sorry.

      Our personal approach is often far more reserved than some photographers. Generally speaking we prefer HDR photos that are closer to what the eye can see. Our goals are generally tasteful and subtle.

      Ipad_Promo_0003_Layer-Comp-4
      FREE CODE 1: 3R3WRFL6AKJ3

      However, how much HDR to use is a personal choice. There are lots of opinions on what’s acceptable and that’s a good thing. The techniques used by all HDR shooters can be adapted to most styles of shooting with both aesthetic and technical benefits.

      Ipad_Promo_0002_Layer-Comp-3
      FREE CODE 2: YF6XP7WFHN67


      iPad Only?

      The book is only available for iPad owners. This is necessary in order to take advantage of all the interactive features available in iBooks. Our update includes a whole chapter on post-processing with 12 video tutorials. That’s right – this is a book but it contains video training. There are even quizzes so you can make sure you’ve read and understood the material. We’re very excited about this book because it uses all the tools available in Apple’s iBooks Author to create a fully interactive experience. You’ll not only be able to read the text, but you’ll find video, audio, motion graphics and more.
      We will continually update the book and the great thing about Apple’s iBooks is that we can push those updates to buyers free of charge.

      Ipad_Promo_0000_Layer-Comp-1
      FREE CODE 3: WXJ3FTX69K44

      You can get more information about the book and a link to purchase it here on the
      iTunes store.


      Ipad_Promo_0001_Layer-Comp-2
      FREE CODE 4: LEK73YHWHWJR





      Comments

      Photoshop Easter Egg — Bread & Coffee

      psbc
      I originally posted this over at Photofocus… be sure to check it out. Photofocus is the most comprehensive photo site on the web with daily news and a kick ass podcast (if I do say so myself).

      Photoshop has a long history of tiny Easter Eggs hidden inside the app… little jokes left over by the programmers. There's a new one tied to the shades of the user interface. How dark are the elements around the screen?

      Currently the chips look like this.
      PSAPP1


      But you can change how they look…

      Choose:
      • Photoshop > Preferences > Interface... (Mac)
      • Edit > Preferences > Interface... (Windows)

      PSAPP2

      You'll find the Easter Eggs this way
      • Shift + Opt + Cmd + click on a gray chip = Bread (Mac)
      • Shift + Alt + Ctrl + click on a gray chip = Bread (Windows)

      or like Coffee…. just repeat the process and click again.

      PSAPP3

      Enjoy!

      Head over to Photofocus for more, great resources.
      Comments

      Sony Alpha NEX-6 Camera: Hands-On Overview

      Adorama Photography TV presents the Sony Alpha NEX-6 Camera. The Sony NEX-6 camera is similar to the Sony NEX-7, only more affordable and will fit in your pocket. In this episode, Rich describes the many features of this new compact interchangeable lens camera. Follow along as he describes the settings and results of different images that he took while experimenting with this camera.
      Comments

      Coming Soon: A New Podcast Series

      podcast_cover

      You'll dig it… I promise.

      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast February 5 with Syl Arena

      photofocuslogo

      Here is the new feed: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Download episode here…   or get it on iTunes
      Rich is joined by special guest Syl Arena to discuss a range of topics to help photographers of all levels.
      Syl Arena is known around the world more for his “colorful” hair or the colorful words and photos he shared in his best-selling Speedliter’s Handbook. Either way, he has a memorable persona.

      Discussed on the show:
      • Portrait posing techniques
      •  Working with your subject
      • Lighting on location
      •  Studio work
      • The latest offerings from Canon
      •  Why self-publish and use a blog
      • Syl’s upcoming workshops
      • Favorite shooting places

      Download the episode here…

      Hosted by Rich Harrington and
      Syl Arena.
      _______
      This Post Sponsored by:
      • lynda.com Learn photography anytime, anywhere, and at your own pace—from bite-sized tutorials to comprehensive courses. Try lynda.com free for 10 days by visiting lynda.com/ Photofocus.
      • Skip Cohen University Professional photo education for wedding & portrait photographers. Sign up for SCU THRIVE in Vegas, March 8, 9 – 2013
      • ShootProof – Use code BOURNE20 to save 20% off the first year of any level plan – even monthly
      • Drobo - Not only is Drobo 5D fast, but it’s easy-to-use, expandable, flexible, and protected.
      Comments

      Almost 100 Free Photoshop Videos

      FreePSTraining

      How'd you like almost 100 free Photoshop videos? Thanks for Peachpit and Adobe for brining my videos live to you for free.

      Visit the Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 on Adobe TV.

      Learn essential imaging skills from Photoshop Expert Richard Harrington. This video series is based on Richard’s book Understanding Photoshop CS6. These videos provide a strong foundation of any Photoshop user. Learn more about the book at peachpit.com

      Here's a sample.
      Comments

      The Secret to Cleaner HDR Photos



      In this tutorial I show you how to get cleaner HDR photographs. In this example I am merging three exposures shot from a bouncing and moving platform (aka a boat). The correction tools in Nik HDR Efex Pro 2 did an excellent job of removing unwanted distortion and poor overlap.

      For more great photo resources, check out Photofocus for daily news!
      Comments

      iPhoto tutorial: Creating a PDF of your book to email


      This iPhoto tutorial shows how to create a high-resolution PDF file of your book to back up the layout, and an optimized version to sync to iPads and email. Watch more at
      http://www.lynda.com/iPhoto-tutorials/Creating-Photo-Books-iPhoto/115960-2.ht.... This tutorial is a single movie from the Creating Photo Books with iPhoto course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 2 hours and 7 minutes long and and shows how to make thoughtful, personalized gifts of photo books with iPhoto. Introduction 1. Getting Ready to Make a Book 2. Choosing a Book Theme 3. Customizing Layout for an iPhoto Book 4. Text and Captions 5. Formatting Images in a Book 6. Using Maps in a Book Layout 7. Finalizing a Book 8. Creating the Book 9. Other Export Options Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      iPhoto tutorial: Customizing a map's location


      This iPhoto tutorial shows how to edit the location tags added to images with the Map layout. Watch more at
      http://www.lynda.com/iPhoto-tutorials/Creating-Photo-Books-iPhoto/115960-2.ht.... This tutorial is a single movie from the Creating Photo Books with iPhoto course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 2 hours and 7 minutes long and and shows how to make thoughtful, personalized gifts of photo books with iPhoto. Introduction 1. Getting Ready to Make a Book 2. Choosing a Book Theme 3. Customizing Layout for an iPhoto Book 4. Text and Captions 5. Formatting Images in a Book 6. Using Maps in a Book Layout 7. Finalizing a Book 8. Creating the Book 9. Other Export Options Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      Nikon D5200 Digital SLR: First Look


      Adorama Photography TV presents the Nikon D5200 Digital SLR. Join Adorama TV host Rich Harrington in Times Square where he got a first peek at this brand new camera from Nikon. The camera showed up and he rushed out the same day to do a quick overview.

      Rich will not only show you what's in the box, but he also takes the camera out to the streets to test the features, presets, mode effects, and much more. Keep checking back for a more in-depth review of this camera, coming soon.

      Note, the camera DOES have a mic input, but no headphone jack. We'll update in the in-depth review shortly.

      Comments

      Don't Miss SCU (Skip Cohen University)

      scubanner

      I am honored to have been invited to guest lecture at Skip Cohen University. This event is a great opportunity to learn from top pros in an intimate location. You get a ton of direct interaction with both the faculty and the students. The first program: a day-and-a-half live workshop and launch event in Las Vegas, March 8-9. Registration information and extra details are
      here.

      Skip Cohen University’s team, or “faculty,” as it were, include Dean of the Wedding School: Clay Blackmore; Dean of the Portrait School: Matthew Jordan Smith; Dean of Video/Fusion: Rich Harrington; Dean of Marketing: Scott Bourne; Dean of Students: Michele Celentano, and more to be announced.

      In case you're not familiar with Skip, let me say he is one of the most knowledgable and generous educators in the photo industry. A few career highlights.
      • Former President of Hasselblad USA
      • Past President/Chief Operating Officer of Rangefinder Publishing Inc.
      • Current President/Founder of Marketing Essentials International and the Photo Resource Hub
      • Ran Rangefinder Magazine, After Capture Magazine, the Wedding and Portrait Photographers International Association and the WPPI Convention and Trade Show
      • Vice President of the Photographic Manufacturer’s and Distributor’s Association
      • Author of six photography books

      Some of you may have heard of his great event called
      Skip Cohen’s summer school. The event has now expanded in both dates and scope. I highly recommend you keep an eye on this event and consider attending.

      "We’ve decided to do something radical. We’re going to go back to basics. To human handshakes, telephone calls, meetings that happen face-to-face in a room full of people who share a passion for photography. If you want to learn, you need a variety of tools – including hands-on education with outstanding instructors who know how to teach and can give you the time you need to develop your skills. Sure, we’ll do stuff online. We’ll offer webinars, blog posts and podcasts, Google Hangouts and more. But there will always be humans behind everything we offer, and a chance to interact with them in real life. You need a network of vendors and associates who help you through those challenges you face in growing your skills and business. You need the ability to customize your own program in order to grow at your own pace without waiting in lines, dealing with crowded giant ballroom programs and never feeling the intimacy of building new friendships with your peers and instructors. Welcome to Skip Cohen University."


      Comments

      iPhoto tutorial: Organizing images with a Smart Album


      This iPhoto tutorial shows how to add your photos to a Smart Album automatically using parameters like ratings, keywords, locations, or even facial recognition profiles. Watch more at
      http://www.lynda.com/iPhoto-tutorials/Creating-Photo-Books-iPhoto/115960-2.ht....

      This tutorial is a single movie from the Creating Photo Books with iPhoto course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 2 hours and 7 minutes long and and shows how to make thoughtful, personalized gifts of photo books with iPhoto.

      • Introduction
      • 1. Getting Ready to Make a Book
      • 2. Choosing a Book Theme
      • 3. Customizing Layout for an iPhoto Book
      • 4. Text and Captions
      • 5. Formatting Images in a Book
      • 6. Using Maps in a Book Layout
      • 7. Finalizing a Book
      • 8. Creating the Book
      • 9. Other Export Options
      • Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      iPhoto tutorial: Improve a washed out photo with saturation


      This iPhoto tutorial shows how to improve an overexposed or washed out image with the Saturation control. Watch more at
      http://www.lynda.com/iPhoto-tutorials/Enhancing-Photos-iPhoto/115961-2.html?u.... This tutorial is a single movie from the Enhancing Photos with iPhoto course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 1 hour and 30 minutes long and shows how to increase the quality of your photos using iPhoto. Introduction 1. Controlling the iPhoto Interface 2. Essential Repairs 3. Improving Exposure 4. Improving Color 5. Black and White Effects 6. Polishing an Image 7. Managing Changes to Photos Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      iPhoto tutorial: Refining the black and white effect with temperature


      This iPhoto tutorial shows how to improve black and white conversions by enhancing Definition and Contrast before applying the B&W effect, and refining the results with the Temperature slider. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/iPhoto-tutorials/Enhancing-Photos-iPhoto/115961-2.html?u....

      This tutorial is a single movie from the Enhancing Photos with iPhoto course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 1 hour and 30 minutes long and shows how to increase the quality of your photos using iPhoto.

      Introduction
      1. Controlling the iPhoto Interface
      2. Essential Repairs
      3. Improving Exposure
      4. Improving Color
      5. Black and White Effects
      6. Polishing an Image
      7. Managing Changes to Photos
      Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      Photofocus with Special Guest Frederick Van Johnson

      photofocuslogo
      Here is the new feed: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Download episode here…   or get it on iTunes
      PLEASE BE PATIENT – OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH.
      Photofocus catches up with photographer and podcaster Frederick Van Johnson.
      • Frederick’s start as a combat photographer
      • How companies like Apple and Adobe are evolving to build new tools for photographers
      • Practical advice for getting more eyeballs for your photography
      • Why you need a Pinterest account
      • Why Google+ may be a photographer love-fest, but not good for business
      • Why you want customer testimonials
      • Optimize your images for the web and making them easier to find.
      • Favorite photo apps for smart phones
      • Favorite plugins for photo processing
      • The camera bag you’ll want to get if you fly on planes

      Download the episode here…
      If you want to try Frederick’s marketing course, he has a bunch of free samples posted. you can check it out here 
      http://essentialwebmarketing.com/sales-2/
      If you like it, here’s a discount code: PHOTOFOCUS to save $50

      Hosted by Rich Harrington
      Comments

      Time to Update to Adobe Camera Raw 7.3

      ACR_73

      I know you’ve been busy with the holidays, so you may have missed that a new Adobe Camera Raw plugin was officially released.
      It is only downloadable as an update through Adobe Photoshop CS6.
      • Launch Adobe Photoshop.
      • Choose Help > Updates.
      • Run any updates that show up in the Adobe Application Manager by clicking the Update button.

      The following cameras are now supported.
      • Canon EOS 6D
      • Canon PowerShot S110
      • Canon PowerShot G15
      • Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
      • Casio Exilim EX-ZR1000
      • Casio Exilim EX-FC300S
      • Leica M-E
      • Nikon 1 V2
      • Nikon D5200
      • Nikon D600
      • Olympus PEN E-PL5
      • Olympus PEN E-PM2
      • Olympus STYLUS XZ-2 iHS
      • Panasonic DMC-GH3
      • Pentax K-5 II
      • Pentax K-5 IIs
      • Pentax Q10
      • Sony DSC-RX1
      • Sony NEX-VG30
      • Sony NEX-VG900

      Download Links

      Camera Raw 7.3 – Please use the update mechanism in Photoshop CS6
      DNG Converter 7.3 - 
      WindowsMac
      Comments

      iPhoto tutorial: Changing the page layout with options


      This iPhoto tutorial shows how to take control of your page layout with Book Settings options such as Auto-Layout pages and Include the Apple logo at the end of the book. Watch more at
      http://www.lynda.com/iPhoto-tutorials/Creating-Photo-Books-iPhoto/115960-2.ht.... This tutorial is a single movie from the Creating Photo Books with iPhoto course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 2 hours and 7 minutes long and and shows how to make thoughtful, personalized gifts of photo books with iPhoto. Introduction 1. Getting Ready to Make a Book 2. Choosing a Book Theme 3. Customizing Layout for an iPhoto Book 4. Text and Captions 5. Formatting Images in a Book 6. Using Maps in a Book Layout 7. Finalizing a Book 8. Creating the Book 9. Other Export Options Conclusion

      Follow Me on Twitter or Facebook

      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      Checking the info on an image in iPhoto


      This iPhoto tutorial shows how to check the image info in order to find the file format and resolution, which may impact image processing. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/iPhoto-

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      Comments

      DSLR Tutorial: What is a Monopod?



      This digital video tutorial explains why you might use a monopod: they're lightweight, taller than tripods, and ideal for shooting large events. Watch more at
      http://www.lynda.com/video-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips/103707-2.html

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      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      Canon EOS-6D First Look Review


      Adorama Photography TV presents the Canon EOS-6D Digital SLR. Adorama TV host Rich Harrington gets his hands on a Canon 6D. He takes it out for a long day of shooting under different conditions in Las Vegas (including a bunch of lowlight shooting). A full review is coming shortly, but we wanted you do see what the Canon 6D can do.

      AdoramaTV features talented hosts including: Mark Wallace, Gavin Hoey, Joe McNally, Joe DiMaggio, Tamara Lackey, Bryan Peterson, and Rich Harrington.

      Comments

      GigaPan Epic Pro: Hands-On Overview


      Adorama Photography TV presents the GigaPan Epic Pro Robotic Panohead. This pro-level kit is designed to help create fantastic multi-pixel panoramic images for print or web interactivity. This product is perfect for making very detailed, zoom-able images that can be posted on social media websites or on personal blogs.

      Join Rich as he takes you step-by-step through the GigaPan set-up and then shows you how to manage the menu control system. Be sure to catch Rich in the upcoming GigaPan episode where he will reveal how to stitch your new photos together with the GigaPan Stitch software to create incredible panoramic images.
      Comments

      The Exposure Triangle

      exposuretriangle
      An essential concept in photography is the exposure triangle. Three settings in your camera affect how your camera exposes an image: ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. If you’re used to shooting in Automatic mode, you may have never adjusted these properties. However, if you’ve used Aperture or Shutter Priority mode, you’ve started to dabble with manual control.
      When shooting video, you’ll likely need to shoot entirely in Manual mode and take precise control over all three properties to get the exposure you need. Even if you think you’ve mastered exposure for your DSLR when shooting stills, keep reading. Getting the correct exposure for video is more complicated because of video’s limitations.

      Shutter Speed

      The first property you’ll set is the side of the triangle with the least flexibility. The shutter speed controls how long your camera stays open when you take a photo. It has a similar function in video because it greatly impacts how much light comes through. The shutter speed also controls the amount of motion blur in an image.

      04fig02_alt
      The camera was locked down on a tripod and properly exposed for this shot. When my son is moving quickly, the shutter speed emphasizes the motion blur; when he’s moving slowly or holding still, he’s much more in focus.

      To simulate a filmic image, you need to use the optimum shutter angle to accompany the 24p frame rate in a DSLR. You can use this simple formula:

      one second ÷ (frame rate x 2)

      For example, when shooting 24 fps, you would set your light meter to a 1/48 second exposure time (you may only have 1/50 as a choice). At 30 fps, you would use 1/60 of a second. Following this guideline will help ensure that the motion blur created by the camera looks natural.
      Can this rule be broken? Of course. There are two instances in which you will break this rule:

      • If you want to take on a more stylized approach to your video, you can change the shutter speed. A long shutter speed creates more motion blur and streaking. A shorter speed creates more of a hyper-action look with staccato movements.
      • If all else fails and you can’t get the exposure you need, you can change the shutter speed to let more (or even less) light into the camera. However, this change should only be made after you’ve exhausted the available aperture and ISO options.

      Aperture

      An easy way to think of aperture is as a window. The bigger the window, the more light you let into your camera. Easy enough, right? Of course, a lower number for the f-stop means a bigger opening (which can seem backwards at first).

      04fig03_alt

      The lower the f-stop, the wider the aperture. A wider opening lets more light into your camera. Image from Wikimedia Commons. Image by Cbuckley and Dicklyon.

      The advantage of having a lower f-stop means that you have more control over how much light gets into the camera. This sounds easy; just use the lowest number, right? Well, it’s not that simple. Here are a few details to consider:

      • The more you open the aperture, the shallower the depth of field. When shooting with an f/1.4 lens, you can literally have a person’s nose in focus while the ears are out of focus.
      • A lens with a lower f-stop is often more expensive. Most kit lenses have f-stops that range from f/4 to f/6. On the other hand, professional zooms can get as fast as f/2.8 and professional prime lenses (fixed focal length) can get even faster.
      • Cheaper zoom lenses change their f-stop as you move through the zoom. This can lead to an exposure change in the middle of a video shot if you attempt to use the zoom options.
      Typically, I’ll use aperture as my first control for exposure. After I’ve locked in my ISO, I then adjust my aperture to achieve a proper exposure. Often, aperture can be used to control the depth of field in an image (how soon the image starts to go out of focus). For many, this shallow depth of field is a desirable aspect to shooting on a DSLR.

      ISO


      Your camera has an ISO setting that controls how sensitive its sensor is to light. The lower the number, the less sensitive the sensor is. For most cameras, an ISO setting of 100 is considered the base setting. This ISO works well when shooting under bright lights or sunny days.
      As lighting conditions change, you can bump up the ISO setting to 200 or 400 to deal with mixed lighting or overcast days. Higher ISO settings, like 800, 1250, and even 1600, can be used for nighttime and low-light shooting. Many newer DSLR cameras offer even higher ISO settings.
      However, it’s important to remember that cranking up the ISO is literally like turning up the volume. As the signal is amplified, the amount of visible noise increases. For still workflows, this noise can often be cleaned up with filters. For video, you’re out of luck. Too much noise will result in a grainy image with dancing pixels. Be sure to test your camera and determine how high of an ISO setting you’re comfortable using.

      04fig05_alt

      The noise becomes very visible in this low-light image. In this case, an ISO of 6400 was used; however, it produces an unusable image. Be careful not to boost your ISO too high when shooting in low light, or visible noise will ruin the shot.

      Be sure to check out the book — Creating DSLR Video: From Snapshots to Great Shots

      Comments

      One Day Sale on Cool Tiffen Apps

      tiffenapps

      Two of my favorite iOS apps are on sale. I love Tiffen's filters…. and they work on your iOS device too! For Cyber Monday (November 26 only) the apps are on sale.

      Tiffen Photo fx iPhone and iPod Touch App

      Optimized for the iPhone 5 and newest iPod Touch, Photo fx is the most comprehensive, feature rich photo app available for the iPhone and iPod Touch. Featuring simulations of many of our award-winning Tiffen glass filters, plus specialized lenses, optical lab processes, film grain, exacting color correction, natural light and photographic effects along a clever paint system with a variety of brushes are now at your fingertips.
      Sale Price: $0.99


      Tiffen Photo fx Ultra iPad App

      Photo fx Ultra includes all the great features from the iPhone App and takes advantage of the greater "real estate" on the iPad and iPad Mini. Find out why "Pocket Lint" named Photo fx Ultra the App of the Day saying: "This app is absolutely essential for the keen photographer, but so simple that it could be used by anyone."
      Sale Price:$2.99

      Comments

      Buy At Least One Prime Lens

      1primelens
      When you bought your DSLR, it probably came with a zoom lens that easily lets you get a wide range of coverage with just a quick twist of the wrist. So, why on earth would you go back in time and pick up a prime lens that only offers a single focal length?
      It’s all about aperture.
      Most prime lenses offer apertures that open as far f/1.2 to f/2. These wide openings let in a lot more light, which is truly useful when shooting in existing light or low-light environments.
      Prime lenses are universally faster than zoom lenses and typically are much cheaper as well. This is due to the way the lenses are manufactured. Prime lenses have fewer moving parts and elements than zoom lenses.
      Having a prime lens or two in your kit will really come in handy in the following situations:
      • When you need to shoot in very low-light conditions
      • When you want to shoot with a shallow depth of field to blur your background or give the video a more filmic look

      Be sure to check out the book —
      Creating DSLR Video: From Snapshots to Great Shots
      Comments

      Holiday Photo Clinic – Better Pictures to Share

      Photoshop Holiday Photo Clinic from Richard Harrington on Vimeo.


      This is a repeat.. but its useful info (especially this time of year). Join me as I tackle 12 holiday images. This in-depth class will show you how to fix both standard and advanced problems that often plague holiday photos. If you like my training be sure to check out my book,
      Understanding Photoshop CS6.


      Comments

      Israel On My Mind

      500pxisrael

      I've shared some photos from my trip to Israel this summer. A look at some of the people and small details of its cities. Here's hoping for some peace again soon.

      500px.com/rhedpixel/sets/israel_on_my_mind
      Comments

      My Thoughts on the Nikon D600


      Adorama Photography TV presents the Nikon D600 Digital SLR. In this episode, I show you what Nikon's latest Digital SLR is all about.

      Join Rich as he walks you through the many features and modes of this amazing camera. Watch as he explains all that it can do, such as shooting RAW and uncompressed HD video. Then, follow along as he takes you through the menu system for a closer look.

      Comments

      Photoshop CS6 Blur Gallery In-Depth

      Photoshop CS6 Blur Gallery from Future Media Concepts on Vimeo.


      Learn how to take control over focus and depth of field using Photoshop CS6. This video was recorded at the NAB Conference.
      Comments

      DSLR tutorial: Understanding aspect ratios



      This DSLR tutorial introduces aspect ratio and discusses the different variations of aspect ratios and how they're used in the industry. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips-Rich-Harrington/103707-...

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      Comments

      DSLR tutorial: Understanding card specs


      This DSLR video tutorial helps you choose between the two most popular types of media storage cards: compact flash and SD. The movie discusses the pros and cons, such as speed and durability. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/video-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips/103707-2.html?utm_medium....

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      Comments

      Intricate Details — Two Recent Shots from NYC

      I recently led a workshop on tasteful HDR up in New York City for Adorama. In fact I'm working on a new eBook on the same subject.

      Here's two shots from the day… behind the scenes to come soon.

      flatiron
      Flat Iron Building by Richard Harrington

      street
      Urban Landscape by Richard Harrington
      Comments

      Photofocus October 15 with Special Guest RC Concepcion

      Here is the new feed: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Download episode here...  or get it on iTunes
      PLEASE BE PATIENT - OUR SERVERS SEE LARGE LOADS ON PUBLISHING DAYS. THE DOWNLOADS MAY GO SLOWLY BUT THEY WILL FINISH.
      Host Rich Harrington and Scott Bourne catchup, then are joined by special guest RC Concepcion.

      Then we head back to Photoshop World to catch up with photographer and educator 
      RC Concepcion.
      • HDR rising again
      • DSLR video gets easier
      • Putting photography on the web
      • Look's that are now hot
      • Creating a Home for Your Photography
      • Getting Inspired
      Download the episode here...
      Hosted by Rich Harrington & Scott Bourne
      ______
      This Post Sponsored by: Viewbug - Fun Photo Contests EPSON® Signature Worthy®. High-quality fine art papers. Learn more at PROIMAGING.EPSON.COM Kelby Training – Use code KTSBA12 to save $20 Ice Society - Save $115 Promo Code: Bourne
      Comments

      How to compare sensor size in DSLR cameras


      This tutorial discusses the differences between cameras with a full frame sensor and cameras with a crop sensor. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips-Rich-Harrington/103707-...

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      Get 7 days of free unlimited access to lynda.com.
      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast October 5, 2012


      Download episode here…  or get it on iTunes
      Host Rich Harrington has two guests on this week’s show
      First we talk to photographer and photo educator
      Jan Kabili.
      • How she switched from being a lawyer to fine art photography
      • What’s new in Photoshop Elements 11
      • Strategies for organizing a photo library
      • How to choose between Elements, Lightroom. and Photoshop

      Then we head back to Photoshop World to catch up with wedding photographer and educator
      David Ziser.
      • The challenging market of wedding photography
      • How do price yourself to make a living
      • Avoiding sticker shock with your clients
      • How to market yourself to new clients
      • Forging a relationship with your clients through social media
      • How he went from engineering to photography – ‘Dad, I have a real job’
      • Choosing what to sell, including digital copies
      • Taking the leap from amateur to pro


      Comments

      Adaptive Wide Angle Correction in Photoshop CS6

      Adaptive Wide Angle Correction in Photoshop CS6 from Future Media Concepts on Vimeo.


      Learn how to remove wide angle distortion from a Panoramic photo. This video was recorded at the NAB Conference.
      Comments

      Understanding Resolution

      pixels

      OK, prepare to be temporarily confused (but not for long). A lot of terms are used to describe image resolution. The problem is that many people (and companies) use the wrong terms, which (understandably) leads to a great deal of confusion. Let’s take a quick look at the most common terms and their accurate meanings. Knowing how to describe the resolution of images and output devices will help you make the right decisions when purchasing or choosing gear to use.

      Dots per Inch (dpi)
      The most common term used to describe image resolution is dots per inch (dpi). Although you’ll hear it used for digital cameras and scanners, it is really only appropriate for printers. As a measurement of output resolution, dpi is fairly straightforward.

      To determine dpi, it is necessary to count the number of dots that can fit in a 1″ × 1″ area. A higher dpi can mean smoother photographs or line art; for example, newspapers tend to use around 150 dpi, whereas magazines can use up to 600 dpi. Consumer printers easily print at 600 dpi or even higher, which can produce extremely good results (when using the right paper). An increase in dpi can produce even better-looking images. You’ll see (and hear about) dpi used a lot, but it solely refers to print and physical output.

      Pixels per Inch (ppi)
      When you view your images on a computer monitor, you are seeing pixels displayed on your screen. Computer monitors use the concept of logical inches. Originally, the Mac OS most commonly used 72 pixels per inch (ppi) to match the concept of the printing idea of 72 points per real inch of paper. The Windows OS has traditionally used 96 ppi.

      As computer monitors and portable devices have evolved, they’ve advanced to support variable resolution settings. As such, the actual ppi for a screen can vary greatly depending on the physical size of the screen and the resolution being used by the computer’s graphics card. For example, modern laptops often use resolutions between 100 ppi and 140 ppi, and devices like an iPhone can jump all the way up to 326 ppi to make images crisper on the small screen.
      Worry less about the ratio of pixels per inch on your screen and simply accept that the standard measurement of resolution in Photoshop (and most computer programs) is ppi. When talking about displayed graphics, its ppi, not dpi.

      Samples per Inch (spi)
      Although scanners are less common than they used to be, many professionals still use them to load sketches, photos, and original negatives. Manufacturers often tout the dpi capabilities of their scanner. This is inaccurate. Scanners don’t use dots, they use samples. A sample is when a scanner captures part of an image. Samples per inch (spi) is a measurement of how many samples are captured in the space of one inch. In general, an increase in sampling leads to a file that is truer to its analog original. However, there is a threshold: Once a certain amount of information is surpassed, human senses (and electronic output devices) cannot tell the difference.

      Consumer-level scanners can capture optical resolution ranging between 300 spi and 4800 spi. Professional devices can capture significantly higher optical resolution. If you’re working with a large image, a lower number of samples is fine. If you’re enlarging a very small image, a large number of samples is crucial. More samples per inch translates into more information available as pixels, which can then be harnessed in output when they are converted to dots in the printer. So if your scanner’s software specifies dpi, it really means spi, but you can see how the two are closely related

      Lines per Inch (lpi)
      In professional printing environments, you’ll often hear the term lines per inch (lpi). This is from the traditional process where images with gradiated tones (such as photographs) are screened for printing to create a halftone. This was originally performed by laying film with dots printed on it over the film before exposure. In the digital age, this process and these terms are used less often, but it is still good for you to have a basic understanding. These days, the work of converting an image to lines is performed by an imagesetter. The dots are arranged in lines, and the lpi measurement refers to the number of lines per inch. An increase in lpi results in smoother images.

      This post is from the book Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals

      Comments

      Additional Content Aware Tools in Photoshop CS6

      Additional Content Aware Tools in Photoshop CS6 from Future Media Concepts on Vimeo.


      Learn how to use the many content aware tools in Adobe Photoshop CS6. This video was recorded at the NAB Conference.
      Comments

      Join the Worldwide PhotoWalk

      WWPW2012-logo


      It's that time of year for Scott Kelby's worldwide photo walk. It's an incredibly fun event.

      Q. What is a Photo Walk?
      A. It’s a social photography event where photographers get together (usually in a downtown area or trendy section of town) to walk around, shoot photos, and generally have fun with other photographers.

      Q. When is the 5th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk?
      A. This year’s Worldwide Photo Walk will take place on Saturday, October 13.

      Q. How do I sign up to participate in a Photo Walk?
      A. Go to the Find A Walk page, and search for the location where you’d like to participate in a Photo Walk. Click on the Photo Walk you’d like to sign up for, and you should be taken to its location page. Once you’re here, you should see information about the leader and the walk, including a map showing the exact location. Just above this map will be a button that says “Join This Walk.” Just click that, follow the instructions, and you should be all set! If you don’t see any Photo Walks happening in your area, keep checking back. New ones are being added every day!



      I will be leading a DC-area event for the Worldwide Photo Walk. The event is a fun few hours of shooting pictures and meeting other photographers. There's a few spots left for the July 24th event (it's free).

      Meeting Location & Time
      Vienna Community Center (9:30am - 1:00pm)
      120 Cherry St SE, Vienna, VA- USA

      After the walk, meet at: Church Street Pizza‎- 115 Church Street NE, Vienna

      Sign up here.
      http://worldwidephotowalk.com/walk/vienna-va-united-states-community-center/

      Sign up in your neighborhood too
      http://worldwidephotowalk.com/

      Comments

      Adaptive Wide Angle Command in Photoshop CS6


      Adobe Photoshop CS6 adds to an existing feature that you may not have even been using called Photomerge. Rich Harrington will show you the new Adaptive Wide Angle command to remove all of the lens and perspective distortion in merged photos. You will also learn how to use these exact techniques with video footage, too.
      Comments

      Joe McNally Shares Great Advice for Photgraphers

      Pasted Graphic

      Here is the new feed: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast
      Download episode here…
      Host Rich Harrington and co-host Scott Bourne talk about:

      • The new Nikon D600
      • Perfectly Clear Imaging Technology
      • Mosaic View and Archive for Lightroom
      • Plus Rich sits down for one-on-one interview with Joe McNally


      Download episode here…

      Comments

      Learn About Light Painting

      I recently had a chance to go on a great shoot for Jaguar by my friend Scott Bourne. Here's the resulting image from light painting.
      jaglightpainting-1
      Copyright Scott Bourne 2012 – All Rights Reserved


      From Photofocus

      "Light painting is a great way to find a new creative outlet for your photography. It’s not rocket science – and in fact there no rules. There’s no right or wrong way to do it – you just do it. But I have some pointers that may get you started if you are new to photographic light painting."


      Here's the behind the scenes video


      Read the full story
      Comments

      (Almost) Free HDR Workshop in New York City 10/14

      Screen Shot 2012-09-09 at 10.42.23 AM

      Workshop is Sunday, October 14 from Noon – 4 pm
      Cost is $25 but each attendee will receive a $25 coupon at the event in exchange for a copy of their registration receipt.

      SIGN UP HERE TODAY TO SAVE YOUR SPOT

      Event Description:
      Three letters, HDR, often instill fierce debate among photographers. Some love the techniques, others hate them, but most can't cut through all the noise to make a real decision. The simple truth is that HDR photos are popular and eye-catching, but eye-catching doesn't need to mean an eyesore. By employing proper production and post-production techniques you can create images that stand out for their quality and uniqueness and not some garish effect.

      For Rich Harrington, HDR opens up all sorts of creative options that improve his photography and can for your photography too:
      • Achieve a dramatic range of exposure that shows your subject off in a compelling way
      • Shoot better black and white photos with deeper contrast and details
      • Achieve shots at times of day when the lighting is not as attractive
      • Showcase subjects like architecture, products, or landscapes in a whole new way
      Join Rich for this hands-on Workshop that includes a shooting session at some great nearby locations. During this part of the event, you'll learn to capture HDR photos using your tripod as well as alternative shooting strategies for handheld and supported shooting. In addition, you'll learn to use Aperture priority mode and bracketing to make capturing the perfect exposure easy.

      After the shoot, its back to the classroom for practical developing. Rich will share techniques he's used and published for achieving dynamic color, compelling black and white images, and engaging texture in his photos. In addition, he'll demonstrate how to work within Adobe Photoshop, as well as the benefits of third-party tools like Nik HDR Efex Pro to get great HDR images.

      SIGN UP HERE TODAY TO SAVE YOUR SPOT

      Requirements:
      • A DSLR Camera (Bracketing controls are useful)
      • Adequate memory cards to capture several photos (200+)
      • A solid tripod is useful but not required
      Comments

      Free Webinar and Book for Photoshop Educators & Instructors

      Register for "Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 with Richard Harrington"

      uapcs6
      Want to know what's new in Photoshop CS6? Join author and college instructor Richard Harrington for an overview of the best new features. Qualified instructors can also receive a desk copy of his book, Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 and its accompanying lesson files and video training on DVD.
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 is crafted for use in the classroom and provides a rich learning experience for beginning and intermediate Photoshop students. The book includes 108 video training tutorials that illustrate and expand on the lessons in the book (a perfect edition for motivating students to learn who refuse to read). In addition, the book includes the following teaching materials:

      • lesson files with hundreds of images for the exercises in the book
      • interactive quizzes for each chapter
      • bonus exercises including images

      If you'd like to sample the book prior to the presentation please contact your local Pearson representative for instructor copy requests.

      Register for this presentation here:
      https://pearsononline.webex.com/pearsononline/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=802139180.
      Comments

      Take Control of Depth of Field with the Photoshop Blur Lab


      Adobe Photoshop CS6 includes three new blurring filters. Rich Harrington will show you new ways to blur specific areas in a photo, as well as achieve tilt sheet and vignette effects.
      Comments

      Free Adorama Workshops


      workshop2

      Adorama (a sponsor of my blog and podcasts) is running several free online workshops in September and October.

      Kids and Kameras
      They are shy, playful, funny, stubborn, mad and delightful. So how do you capture these wonderful expressions from children while their parents are yelling "Say Cheese" over your shoulder? It's not easy, but Libby from Studio 32 Photography will give you tips and tricks on how to bring out a child's personality and learn to control the session without breaking a sweat.
      Monday September 24th, 2012 – 9pm EST


      Making Great Photo Books - The Basics:
      Our FREE PixPublisher software can be used by amateurs and professionals alike to create stunning photo books that showcase your pictures beautifully.  During this introductory course we help you get started with PixPublisher by showing you how to create a book from start to finish.
      Wednesday September 12th, 2012 – 4pm EST
      Sunday September 30th, 2012 – 9pm EST


      Taking your Photo Books to the Next Level
      This intermediate level workshop assumes attendees know the basics of our PixPublisher tool and have built at least a few books using it. During this workshop we will discuss more advanced techniques that can help to improve the quality of your photo books.
      Wednesday September 19th, 2012 – 4pm EST
      Wednesday October 10th, 2012 – 4pm EST


      Making Amazing Wedding Books
      With wedding season in full swing, professionals are starting to think about their offerings for 2013 books.. For non-professionals this may be a good time to stop procrastinating and put those gorgeous photos of your wedding into a great looking book. Our workshop will cover the resources available to create great looking albums and some tips on how to get it done quickly.
      Sunday September 16th, 2012 – 9pm EST

      Comments

      A Great Shoot and Intense Piece of Lighting Gear

      I recently had the chance to accompany Scott Bourne (my good friend and partner over at Photofocus) as he shot a magazine ad for Jaguar.

      img_4006-edit

      If you'd like to see the ad (NSFW – for foreign markets) as well as check out how we used the most expensive lighting equipment in the world, check out this post.

      http://photofocus.com/2012/09/06/the-most-incredible-expensive-lighting-system-ive-ever-used-in-photography-nsfw/
      Comments

      (Almost) Free HDR Workshop in New York City 10/14

      Screen Shot 2012-09-09 at 10.42.23 AM

      Workshop is Sunday, October 14 from Noon – 4 pm
      Cost is $25 but each attendee will receive a $25 coupon at the event in exchange for a copy of their registration receipt.

      SIGN UP HERE TODAY TO SAVE YOUR SPOT

      Event Description:

      Three letters, HDR, often instill fierce debate among photographers. Some love the techniques, others hate them, but most can't cut through all the noise to make a real decision. The simple truth is that HDR photos are popular and eye-catching, but eye-catching doesn't need to mean an eyesore. By employing proper production and post-production techniques you can create images that stand out for their quality and uniqueness and not some garish effect.

      For Rich Harrington, HDR opens up all sorts of creative options that improve his photography and can for your photography too:
      • Achieve a dramatic range of exposure that shows your subject off in a compelling way
      • Shoot better black and white photos with deeper contrast and details
      • Achieve shots at times of day when the lighting is not as attractive
      • Showcase subjects like architecture, products, or landscapes in a whole new way
      Join Rich for this hands-on Workshop that includes a shooting session at some great nearby locations. During this part of the event, you'll learn to capture HDR photos using your tripod as well as alternative shooting strategies for handheld and supported shooting. In addition, you'll learn to use Aperture priority mode and bracketing to make capturing the perfect exposure easy.

      After the shoot, its back to the classroom for practical developing. Rich will share techniques he's used and published for achieving dynamic color, compelling black and white images, and engaging texture in his photos. In addition, he'll demonstrate how to work within Adobe Photoshop, as well as the benefits of third-party tools like Nik HDR Efex Pro to get great HDR images.

      SIGN UP HERE TODAY TO SAVE YOUR SPOT

      Requirements:

      • A DSLR Camera (Bracketing controls are useful)
      • Adequate memory cards to capture several photos (200+)
      • A solid tripod is useful but not required
      Comments

      Time-lapse Using Photoshop CS6


      AdoramaTV presents DSLR | Video Tips with Richard Harrington. Now that you've learned about what gear you need when shooting time-lapse as well as techniques for how to processes your images in post-production, Rich will take you a step further in creating your time-lapse animation.

      In this episode Rich demonstrates how to set up a video timeline, organize the files, process the images, and prepare for export and posting. Join Rich in this step-by-step tutorial of how to build time-lapse animations using Adobe Photoshop CS6.

      Check Out More Tutorials – http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL45101D7EFD3E733A
      Comments

      Shooting with the Lensskirt

      edge bellagio2

      I recently had the chance to shoot some stills and time-lapse from the City Center in Las Vegas.
      To make shooting through the double glass windows easier we used Lenskirts.

      The LENSKIRT is a portable, flexible hood which you attach to the end of your camera lens. It allows you to shoot pictures / video through glass without internal environmental reflections such as yourself, room lights, camera flashes, light leak from under a door.



      A11SlOeCQAArELZ.jpg-large

      Here we are all setup (shooting with my friend Scott Bourne and my assistant Pamela Ann Berry).

      edge bellagio

      The resulting view was great. The above shot was a 3-second exposure and there's no reflection.

      Comments

      Mastering Levels Adjustments

      The Levels command corrects tonal ranges and color balance issues. With this command you can fix poor exposure. Additionally, you can perform color correction by manually identifying a white point and black point in the image. Nearly every image can benefit from making a Levels adjustment.

      To understand Levels, you must be able to read a histogram. This graph works as a visual guide for adjusting the image. The Levels adjustment has its own histogram that is visible when working in the Adjustments panel. You may also want to call up the Histogram panel (Window > Histogram) and leave it open while color correcting to help you spot issues in color and contrast. You can also expand the Histogram panel by clicking the submenu and choosing All Channels View. Let’s give the command a try.

      1. Add a Levels adjustment layer by clicking the Levels icon in the Adjustments panel. Levels is also available from the Adjustments menu (Image > Adjustments), but the adjustment layer is more flexible for future modifications.

      levels1

      2. This photo was shot under mixed light, but you can reset the black and white points of the image to fix the exposure. In the Adjustments panel, move the white Input Levels slider to the left. This affects the image’s white point and allows you to reassign where white should begin in the image.

      3. Move the black Input Levels slider slowly to the right. The more you move the black slider to the right, the more contrast is introduced into the image.
      levels5levels4

      4. The true power lies in the middle (gray) Input Levels slider. By moving this slider, you can modify the gamma setting. Effectively, you can use the middle Input Levels slider to change the intensity of the midtones. This adjustment can be made without making dramatic changes to the highlights and shadows, and lets you better expose an image. Move the slider to the left to add light; move the slider to the right to subtract light.
      levels7levels6

      In the future if you need to edit the adjustment, simply select the adjustment layer in the Layers panel and manipulate the controls in the Adjustments panel.

      TIP Rinse and Repeat
      If you have several images from the same camera or shoot, they may need the same Levels adjustment. The Save button allows you to save a Levels adjustment (to the folder that contains the image is a good place). You can then click the Load button to apply that adjustment to another image.

      Get the new book –
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6
      Get the whole chapter for free here –
      Download Chapter 10: Color Correction and Enhancement
      Comments

      Time-lapse from the Valley of Fire



      A Time-lapse series from the Valley of Fire in Las Vegas.

      Comments

      How to Approach Color Correction

      New users often have a difficult time when color correcting or enhancing images. They generally lose sight of the goal: making the image look better while still being believable. Many users go “too far” in their quest to fix images. If the image starts to look fake or too altered, it will be distracting. Although getting it “right” requires some practice, here’s some general advice to get you started:

      iStock_000005325740Small

      • Identify what’s wrong. Before you can fix a picture, be sure you have decided on what’s wrong. Is it too dark? Is the sky washed out? Has the picture faded over time? Make a list and prioritize the issues you find in each image. It’s easiest to fix one problem at a time, and if you identify those problems, you’ll know when to stop twiddling with the image.
      • Work with a copy of the image. Before you start to color correct an image, you should duplicate it. This way you can return to an original version if you make a mistake or go too far in your image touch-up. After opening your file, choose File > Save As and name the duplicate version that will be corrected. Color correction can be a destructive process, meaning that you cannot revert to the original state at a later time. By preserving an original version of the image or employing adjustment layers, you make nondestructive editing possible. Some users also choose to duplicate the Background layer at the bottom of the layer stack.
      • Edit with adjustment layers. Adjustment layers allow you to apply most of the image correction commands as nondestructive effects. They are added as a layer above the actual image; the adjustment layer can be blended, masked, or deleted at any time. Additionally, if you select the adjustment layer, you can modify its properties in the Adjustments panel. The same modifications are available in both the Adjustments menu and Adjustments panel. You should work with an adjustment layer whenever possible because its flexibility will be important for future revisions.
      • Get a fresh opinion. It’s not a bad idea to step back and examine your work. Open the backup copy of the original image and compare it to the image you’ve been working on. This before-and-after comparison can be very useful. If you have a fresh set of eyes nearby, ask that person for his or her opinion.
      • Use Smart Filters. This will open up most of the filters and several of the image adjustments including the Shadows/Highlights command and Variations. Just choose Filter > Convert for Smart Filters.


      Get the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6
      Get the whole chapter for free here –
      Download Chapter 10: Color Correction and Enhancement

      Comments

      WiFi Photography


      Adorama Photography TV presents WiFi Photography. A new photography trend is on the market that has the ability to connect directly to the internet and upload pictures or video right from the camera. Check out the new cameras with this functionality built-in or find out how you can add this functionality to your existing camera with a WiFi card.

      In this episode, Rich demonstrates the capabilities of the Canon Wifi Powershot, the Samsung ST200F Smart, the Samsung NX20 "Wireless" camera, and the new Eye-Fi memory card. These items are designed to allow you to instantly transfer photos and video to social media sites or networks. Discover how you can automatically upload from your camera to your favorite sharing sites, such as Facebook, Picasa, Youtube, or Photobucket.
      Comments

      Free Webinar and Book for Photoshop Educators & Instructors

      Register for "Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 with Richard Harrington"

      uapcs6
      Want to know what's new in Photoshop CS6? Join author and college instructor Richard Harrington for an overview of the best new features. Qualified instructors can also receive a desk copy of his book, Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 and its accompanying lesson files and video training on DVD.
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 is crafted for use in the classroom and provides a rich learning experience for beginning and intermediate Photoshop students. The book includes 108 video training tutorials that illustrate and expand on the lessons in the book (a perfect edition for motivating students to learn who refuse to read). In addition, the book includes the following teaching materials:

      • lesson files with hundreds of images for the exercises in the book
      • interactive quizzes for each chapter
      • bonus exercises including images

      If you'd like to sample the book prior to the presentation please contact your local Pearson representative for instructor copy requests.

      Register for this presentation here:
      https://pearsononline.webex.com/pearsononline/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=802139180.
      Comments

      Nikon D800: Product Review



      Adorama Photography TV presents Nikon D800 Digital SLR. This camera is perfect for the pro or the enthusiast. Designed with the videographer in mind, the Nikon D800 can record full HD 1080p, while having the ability to hear and adjust the audio with the built-in headphone jack.

      The Nikon D800 has specialty features such as HDR and time-lapse. The HDR mode shoots at up to 9 bracketed exposures, which is perfect for landscape photography. The built-in time-lapse mode records directly to the card as a finished movie or records the individual frames in high resolution to be assembled in post-production.
      Comments

      New Photofocus Podcast Released



      pf

      Host Rich Harrington and co-host Scott Bourne tackle a variety of photography topics.

      • Report from Skip’s Summer School
      • Looking forward to Photoshop World
      • Lighting essentials
      • The new Icelight
      • Portrait lighting
      • Soft box positioning
      • Shooting manual
      • Proper exposure (under or over)
      • Choosing the right shutter speed
      • Getting access for the best view
      • iPad and Droid apps for Photographers
      • The secret of locked gates and doors
      • Thunderbolt vs. USB3

      Download the episode here…

      Comments

      Master The Exposure Triangle for Video



      AdoramaTV Presents DSLR Video Tips with Richard Harrington. Join Rich as he explains the three main elements to consider when deciding on the correct exposure for your video, ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed.

      When using a digital camera, it is important to understand the different manual settings.  You can use these exposure triangle tips when figuring out the relation of the light and how it enters your camera, giving you complete control of your shoot.

      AdoramaTV features talented hosts including: Mark Wallace, Gavin Hoey, Joe McNally, Joe DiMaggio, Tamara Lackey, Bryan Peterson, and Rich Harrington.

      Check Out More Tutorials – http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL45101D7EFD3E733A
      Comments

      Check Out the New Epsiode of Photofocus


      pf
      Host Rich Harrington and co-host Scott Bourne tackle a variety of photography topics.

      • Packing lightly
      • Gear we can’t live without
      • Stupid things camera makers do
      • Raw tricks and raw time-lapse
      • Mountain Lion review
      • Nike HDR Efex2
      • Digital Film Tools Film Stocks
      • Joining an online photo community

      Download the episode here…

      Comments

      How'd I Make This Photo?

      Before_After


      A lot of people asked about how I took the image on the left and developed what was on the right. It's a combination of HDR, Color Grading, Tone-Mapping and more. But all the colors were in the image, I just developed them.

      I've posted a complete
      walkthrough over at TipSquirrel.com. Be sure to head over and check it out as well as look at some of the other great articles over there.

      http://www.tipsquirrel.com/pro-workflow-techniques-start-to-finish/

      Comments

      A Timelapse Shot from Panama


      A new time-lapse from the Panama Canal. Shot on a Nikon D800 in the rain. Shot in raw and developed in Adobe Camera Raw. Post processed with adjustment layers in Adobe After Effects.
      Comments

      Do You Know Joe DiMaggio?

      Joe DiMaggio is a cohost of Adorama TV with me. But more than that… he's just awesome. A nice guy and super generous. I'll have to have him on the Photofocus podcast soon.

      Check out these two videos.

      Action Photography and Panning

      Photography and Light

      Be sure to subscribe to Joe on YouTube –
      Comments

      Need a Waterproof Camera?


      Adorama Photography TV presents the Olympus Tough TG-1 iHS Digital Camera. Rich Harrington describes the many features and functions of this rugged camera. Join Rich as he talks about the precise digital features, flexibility, and durability. Learn why this camera was made for the on the go photographer.

      Related Products
      Comments

      A Cool Photoshop Contest from NAPP

      edge contesthdr
      The deadline to submit your work for The Incredible Makeover Contest is right around the corner. If you haven't submitted your entry for this special contest sponsored by NAPP and Wacom, you only have seven days to do so.

      Don’t miss your chance to share one of your incredible makeovers with the world for the chance to win a grand prize package worth $5,000, as well as have your
      work featured in an upcoming issue of Photoshop User magazine.

      To enter
      NAPP and Wacom’s “The Incredible Makeover” contest, simply submit a before and after image of your greatest work no later than July 31, 2012 and tell us how Photoshop and a Wacom pen tablet helped you transform your creative vision into a real-life masterpiece.

      Along with a panel of NAPP and Wacom officials selecting the grand prize winner, we’ll be bestowing a special People’s Choice Award with the general public
      voting for their favorite submission!
      Good luck!


      Entry Deadline: July 31, 2012 Winners Revealed: August 10, 2012


      Contest Prizes


      $5,000 Grand Prize Award!
      • Wacom Cintiq 21UX Interactive Pen Display
      • Adobe Photoshop CS6
      • Two-Year Membership to NAPP
      • Trip to Photoshop World Conference & Expo, Las Vegas

      People's Choice Award
      • Wacom Cintiq 21UX Interactive Pen Display
      • Adobe Photoshop CS6
      • Two-Year Membership to NAPP

      Honorable Mention Award
      • Wacom Cintiq 21UX Interactive Pen Display
      • One-Year Membership to NAPP
      Comments

      My Top Picks in Photoshop CS6



      AdoramaTV presents Adobe Photoshop CS6. Rich Harrington describes the key features of the newly released digital imaging software. From the Look Up Tables to the all new Crop Tool, Join Rich as he demonstrates the benefits Adobe Photoshop CS6 has to offer to your post production workflow.
      Comments

      Hear My Interview with Photographer Tamara Lackey

      Pasted Graphic

      Here is the new feed: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/photofocuspodcast Download episode here…
       Host Rich Harrington and co-host Scott Bourne interview Tamara Lackey about her photography and business philosophies.

      • Portrait photography techniques
      • Creating a connection with your subject
      • Common mistakes new pros make
      • How to handle photography sales
      • Effective social media techniques for marketing and sales
      • Canon 1DX Review
      • Where to meetup with Rich and Scott for training

      Our Guest
      Tamara Lackey is a renowned professional photographer,  author, speaker and web series host. Her authentic lifestyle photography, from children’s portraits to celebrity portraits, is praised within her industry and published internationally. Tamara’s work has been featured in dozens of media outlets including Vogue, O – The Oprah Magazine, Town & Country, Parenting Magazine, Food & Wine, Men’s Journal, Professional Photographer Magazine, Rangefinder Magazine, NBC’s The Martha Stewart Show, ABC’s Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, CNN’s Anderson, PBS’ Need to Know and NBC’s The Today Show.
      Tamara’s new web series,
      the reDefine Show, examines the inspiring stories of top-tier creative artists who make it work.  Tamara’s interview style showcases her abiding interest in real conversations that share practical tips, innovative methods, and previews of the newest and most useful technologies on the market.
      Download episode here…

      Comments

      iPhoto Gets an Update

      image.jsp

      About iPhoto 9.3.1

      • What's New in Version 9.3.1
      • Addresses a problem during the migration of albums from MobileMe Gallery that may cause photos to be moved from their original events into a new event called "From MobileMe"
      • Fixes an issue that in rare cases could cause iPhoto to hang when upgrading libraries

      • Included in Version 9.3
      • iPhoto can now open libraries from Aperture 3.3 or later 
      • AVCHD video is now supported
      • The Description field now automatically expands as needed when entering text
      • You can now flag a photo in Magnify (1-up) view by clicking a Flag icon displayed in the upper left corner of the photo
      • Keywords and titles are now preserved when exporting files with embedded GPS location data
      • A new Export option allows you to automatically organize exported photos into subfolders by event 

      By the way, don't miss my great iPhoto Training.

      iPhoto: Fix Your Photos – http://tinyurl.com/iphotofix
      The videos provide easy to follow tutorials that help you fix common problems with pictures. You'll learn how to straighten and crop, adjust dark photos, and bring out the color in your snapshots. You'll also learn how to fix soft focus, red eye, and overexposed photos. Whether you're new to iPhoto or even an experienced user, you'll find useful techniques and powerful shortcuts to get your work done faster. Each lesson includes hands on files so you can work along with the instructor.

      iPhoto: Share Your Photos - http://tinyurl.com/iphotoshare
      The videos provide easy to follow tutorials that help you share your pictures over email or post them online to services including MobileMe, Facebook, and Flickr. You’ll also learn techniques for making slideshows and creating your own blog. Whether you're new to iPhoto or even an experienced user, you’ll find useful techniques and powerful shortcuts to share your photos easily. Each lesson includes hands on files so you can follow along with the instructor.
      Comments

      Adobe Lightroom Now Part of Creative Cloud

      LRinCC

      If you were looking for one more reason to step up to Adobe Creative Cloud, it just arrived.
      For $49 a month for pros or $29 a month for students (with annual subscription) you know get the entire Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection, a bunch of cool tablet apps, a suite of online services, and now Adobe Lightroom.
      For those of you  turned off by the name, these are the same apps in the traditional suites.  They install and run off your local computer without a need for a constant Internet connection.  The cloud angle is simply a bunch of online tools for collaboration and backup.

      Comments

      New Drobo Units Announced

      Two new Drobo Units are released. I first saw these a few months ago (we've been helping with the videos for launch).
      We run our whole office on Drobos, love them. Incredibly reliable and easy to manage.

      These two new units are awesome!

      Drobo 5D

      High-performance, desktop storage for professionals



      • 5 drive bays
      • 2 xThunderbolt
      • USB 3.0
      • Thunderbolt and USB cables included
      • SATA or solid state
      • mSATA solid state drive (Turbocharges cache)
      • Power Fail Protection
      • Mac OS X Lion & Mountain Lion
      • Windows 7 & 8


      Drobo Mini

      Portable performance storage with data protection.



      • 4 drive bays
      • 2 xThunderbolt
      • USB 3.01 x USB 3.0 port
      • Thunderbolt and USB cables included
      • 4 2.5" SATA or solid state drives
      • Mac OS X Lion & Mountain Lion
      • Windows 7 & 8



      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast June 15


      Hosts Rich Harrington and Scott Bourne discuss a variety of topics including:
      • Apple Announcements
      • Aperture 3.3
      • Lightroom 4.1
      • Rich's visit to HP
      • Important hardware for upgrading photo editing
      • New lenses from Nikon
      • Olympus point and shoot cameras
      • Smart phone photo shooting
      • Security at malls and airports
      • Travel tips for photographers
      Comments

      My Colorado View

      I visited Colorado today… just a quick trip for business. Much of the state is on fire. It's very sad. If you believe in a higher power… reach out.

      Firephoto Small
      Comments

      Need an Entry Level Workstation for Video or Photo?

      ProVideo Coalition - Z220 HP Workstation - NAB 2012 from RHED Pixel on Vimeo.

      Richard Harrington speaks with HP about the exciting new entry level Z220 Workstation.



      Richard Harrington speaks with HP about the exciting new entry level Z220 Workstation.


      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast June 5


      Hosts Rich Harrington and Scott Bourne discuss a variety of topics including:

      • Google
      • The Google+ Photography Conference
      • Time-lapse tips
      • New Camera bodies and lenses
      • Photoshop CS6
      • Lightroom versus Aperture
      • Camera Raw Tips
      Comments

      What is Lab Color?

      L*a*b* Color is the most complete color mode used to describe the colors visible to the human eye. The three parameters of color are L for luminance of the color, a represents the color’s position between red and green, and b represents its position between yellow and blue.

      The Lab Color mode was created to serve as a device-independent, absolute model to be used for a reference. Lab attempts to simulate the full gamut of color; however, it is a three-dimensional model and can’t be represented properly within Photoshop. Therefore, the * after the L, a, and b is used to signify that it is a derivative model. Lab images can only be printed on PostScript Level 2 and Level 3 printers; for all other professional printers, Lab images must first be converted to CMYK mode.

      The Lab Color mode is generally only used by imaging professionals seeking the truest color fidelity because it supports all the colors in both the RGB and CMYK Color modes.

      Be sure to order your copy of Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 – Shipping Soon!
      Comments

      So What Are Megapixels?

      When you shop for a digital camera, you are bombarded with talk of megapixels. Consumers are often misled about what megapixels are and how many are needed. A megapixel is simply a unit of storage, whether internal or on a removable card. A megapixel is one million pixels and is a term commonly used to describe how much data a digital camera can capture. As with your car, just because your tank can hold more gallons of gas doesn’t mean it’s more fuel efficient or better than your friend’s car.

      Fig-01_01-Camera


      For example, if a camera can capture pictures at 3000 × 2400 pixels, it is referred to as having 7.2 megapixels (3000 × 2400 = 7,200,00). If you were to print that picture on paper at 300 ppi (pixels per inch), it would roughly be a 10" × 8" print. Professional photographers may need more pixels than this, but a consumer may not. It all depends on how the pixels are meant to be displayed or printed.

      The more pixels you capture, the larger the image is (both in disk space and potential print size). Consumer usage (such as email or inkjet prints) is less demanding than professional usage (such as art books or magazines). Professionals need more megapixels than consumers; hence, high-end cameras cost more because they are targeted at people who make money by taking photos.

      Be sure to order your copy of
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS6 – Shipping Soon!


      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast May 25 – Richard Kelly


      Richard Harrington talks with photographer and educator Richard Kelly about important trends for emerging and established professionals. Kelly is the past president of the American Society of Media Photographers and the conversation covers business advice related to pricing, marketing, social media, and contracts for creatives. He also shares a ton of useful resources to help any photographer.

      Comments

      Enhancing color with Vibrance adjustment layers in Photoshop


      Watch the whole class for free (actually all my classes). Free 7-day trial.

      This Photoshop tutorial discusses how to enhance color with a Vibrance adjustment layer. Watch it here.

      This specific tutorial is just a single movie from chapter four of the Nondestructive Exposure and Color Correction with Photoshop course presented by lynda.com author Richard Harrington. The complete Nondestructive Exposure and Color Correction with Photoshop course has a total duration of 1 hour and 31 minutes, and explores using tools from adjustment layers to filters to nondestructively transform your photos.

      Nondestructive Exposure and Color Correction with Photoshop table of contents:

      • Introduction
      • 1. How to Approach Color Correction in Photoshop
      • 2. Nondestructive Workflows in Photoshop
      • 3. Working with Raw Files Nondestructively
      • 4. Performing Primary Image Adjustments
      • 5. Controlling Adjustment Layers
      • 6. Using the Shadow/Highlights Command
      • 7. Special Case Adjustments
      • 8. The Black-and-White Adjustments
      • Conclusion

      Comments

      Canon 5D Mark III and 1DX Compared with Chuck Westfall - NAB 2012

      Canon 5D Mark III and 1DX Compared with Chuck Westfall - NAB 2012 from RHED Pixel on Vimeo.



      Richard Harrington gets a solid overview of the features comparing the 5D Mark III and the 1DX for video. You'll also hear the straight answer on if a clean video output via HDMI is coming/
      Comments

      I Get My Hands on a Nikon D800



      Just a few quick initial thoughts… more to come soon!

      Comments

      Perspective Cropping In Photoshop

      Learn how to perform a Perspective Crop using Adobe Photoshop.

      screen-shot-2012-03-08-at-3-30-10-pm
      A free video over at Photofocus.com


      http://photofocus.com/2012/03/09/free-video-tutorial-perspective-cropping-in-photoshop/

      Comments

      Watch Me Download an 8 Foot Wide Photo in 2 Seconds Over 3G

      Piqsure - 3G Compatability from Piqsure on Vimeo.



      The panoramic photo in this video is streaming over the net at 3G connection speeds. This is a secure file, loading dynamically on an iPad with no plug-ins.
      The left screen shows what was happening on the iPad and the right shows my hands. If you're at Photoshop World, I'll show you face-to-face.

      Comments

      More About Piqsure

      Piqsure - 3G Compatability from Piqsure on Vimeo.



      If you can't tell, I'm pretty excited about this tech.
      These are high resolution images streaming over a 3G connection.
      The left image is a digital output of the iPad (it also works on computers and smartphones). The right shows the touch gestures controlling the image.
      All images are totally secure.

      Here's a news report –
      http://www.tuaw.com/2012/03/02/piqsure-to-provide-fast-full-resolution-browsing-of-images-on-mo/

      Piqsure develops high resolution image publishing and viewing tools to enhance user’s web experience on mobile devices and web browsers. The Piqsure Viewer enables publishers, authors, and photographers the freedom to showcase their portfolio in full resolution and detail in a completely secure environment protecting against piracy. Publishers of magazines, ebooks and ecommerce sites now have the capability of universally distributing their content through all online platforms with Piqsure Reader.We will be demoing the Piqsure technology at Photoshop World in Washington D.C., March 24-26 Booth #560

      Comments

      Introducing Piqsure – A new way to view images online

      I just wanted to share some new technology I discovered. It's called Piqsure and it changes the way images can be viewed online. You can upload high-resolution images, which then essentially dynamically load at whatever resolution you want. It's very fast and takes no plug-ins.

      The guys behind it will be showing it at Photoshop World in Washington, DC (March 23–26).

      Piqsure - Image Watermarking from Piqsure on Vimeo.



      What do you think?

      Comments

      Using Slideshow Presets with Apple Apeture

      This Aperture tutorial titled Creating a Slideshow Album and Picking a Theme is from chapter four of the Creative Slideshows with Aperture course presented by lynda.com author Richard Harrington. This specific tutorial describes how to create a custom slideshow by picking different themes for your photo album. The complete Creative Slideshows with Aperture course has a duration time of 1 hour and 19 minutes and describes how to use Apple Aperture to quickly and efficiently create a slideshow to impress any audience, from family and friends to colleagues and potential clients.

      To view more of this course on lynda.com, click the link above.

      Creative Slideshows with Aperture table of contents:

      • Introduction
      • 1. An Overview of Creating Slideshows
      • 2. Gathering Your Slides
      • 3. Gathering Your Slides
      • 4. Setting up a Custom Slideshow
      • 5. Customizing Individual Slide
      • 6. Working with Video Slides
      • 7. Adding & Customizing Transitions
      • 8. Sharing a Slideshow Movie
      • Conclusion
      Comments

      Join Me for a Time-lapse and Panoramic Workshop at NAB

      redrock

      DSLR Time-Lapse Video Workshop and Field Trip* - NEW
      Saturday, April 12; 12 – 9 p.m.
      New for 2012, Post|Production World registrants may add this two-part Workshop featuring a three-hour session on best practices and techniques for shooting time-lapse video and panoramic photography and a Field Trip to Red Rock National Conservation Area. Registration includes round-trip transportation, lunch, and onsite small group instruction while capturing the western sunset. Participants must bring their own DSLR camera and tripod. Space is extremely limited.


      Comments

      How to Create a Custom Slideshow with Apple Aperture

      This Aperture tutorial titled Creating a Slideshow Album and Picking a Theme is from chapter four of the Creative Slideshows with Aperture course presented by lynda.com author Richard Harrington. This specific tutorial describes how to create a custom slideshow by picking different themes for your photo album. The complete Creative Slideshows with Aperture course has a duration time of 1 hour and 19 minutes and describes how to use Apple Aperture to quickly and efficiently create a slideshow to impress any audience, from family and friends to colleagues and potential clients.
      • To view more of this course on lynda.com, click the link above.
      • Creative Slideshows with Aperture table of contents:
      • Introduction
      • 1. An Overview of Creating Slideshows
      • 2. Gathering Your Slides
      • 3. Gathering Your Slides
      • 4. Setting up a Custom Slideshow
      • 5. Customizing Individual Slide
      • 6. Working with Video Slides
      • 7. Adding & Customizing Transitions
      • 8. Sharing a Slideshow Movie
      • Conclusion
      Comments

      Want some Free Panoramic Photography Inspiration and Training?

      I've taken a stab at figuring out Apple iBooks platform. It's pretty cool tech that let's you mix text, photos, and video into an interactive platform.
      I've taken some of my best panoramic photos (and the tutorials I made about them) and bundled them into an
      iBook.

      pano1_book

      It's free, it's currently the #2 photo book on iTunes in fact (sweet!).
      It only works on an iPad (sorry everyone else, but that's how iBooks author works for now).

      pano2_book


      I hope you enjoy and are inspired to start shooting your own shots. I'm working on new stuff for this platform and would love your feedback. Please post reviews on
      iTunes and comments here.
      Download it here –
      http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/panorama/id497463957?mt=11

      Comments

      Easy Tip to Avoid Accidently Erasing Memory Cards

      Reader_Blue

      I have a tendency to carry a lot (and I mean A LOT) of memory cards on a shoot.  Between shooting panoramic photos, time-lapse sequences, and HD video, I burn through memory cards faster than most.  I find myself needing to be certain that I avoid accidentally erasing data.
      Here’s my strategy for safety:

      • Make sure that all memory cards are erased BEFORE going into the field.  Don’t bring cards with data or you’ll sit there wondering if you transferred them already or if you’re about to wipe your only copy.
      • Have two card wallets.  One full and one empty.  Make sure they have the same number of slots.
      • Put the full wallet with all of the blank memory cards into your right pocket.
      • Put the empty wallet with no cards in it in your left pocket.
      • As you shoot cards, place them upside down in the card wallet in your left pocket.
      • Repeat this phrase ten times… The cards in the right pocket are the right cards to shoot with; the cards in my left pocket should be left alone.

      I know it’s simplistic…  but it’s saved me more than one time.  Give it a shot.

      Comments

      Zoom, Zoom, and Check: Manually Focussing a DSLR Camera for Lowlight and Video Shooting

      When you are shooting in lowlight conditions, it can be very difficult to get your camera to focus.  Similarly, when shooting video, focus often becomes a manual process as well. If want to check focus, you need to take a few extra steps.  Just turning on the LCD and glancing at it won’t cut it.  The small screen makes everything look more in focus because it can’t show you all the pixels at once.  The reduced image size creates the illusion of a sharper image.

      The Technique

      If you want to really see what is in focus, you’ll need to zoom, and then zoom some more.  If you’re using a zoom lens, zoom in as tight as possible on your subject.  Zooming in on an area like the eyes works well; a button on a shirt works well too.  You’ll then need to digitally zoom.
      zoomzoom

      Typically, you’ll find a Zoom button (look for a magnifying glass with a plus symbol in it) on your camera.  Pressing it will enlarge the image on your screen and only show you part of the image.  You may need to use the command dial to navigate around the zoomed in pixels.  Find the detail area that you want to focus on.

      You can then use the focus ring on your camera lens to tweak the focus. Make minor turns to find the ideal focus. If needed, adjust the aperture and ISO settings of your camera to refine the depth of field. When you’re satisfied, you can either press the Zoom Out button or just press the Record button or shutter release to roll the camera.
      Comments

      A Great Post on Getting Started in Photography

      photofocuslogo

      My friend Scott Bourne wrote a great post on getting started in photography. It is a must read for anyone who doesn't consider themselves a photography pro.

      My favorite from the list is

      "5. Don’t try to learn everything all at once. You don’t have to become an expert photographer, post-processor and printer all in the same week."


      You can read the whole list here –
      http://photofocus.com/2012/01/19/10-of-the-things-beginners-should-know-about-photography/
      Comments

      Triple Exposure Podcast #5

      banner3
      Welcome to the Triple Exposure podcast.
      You can direct-download the MP3 here – 
      http://3exposure.podomatic.com/entry/2012-01-16T09_52_42-08_00

      You can subscribe on iTunes here - 
      http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/triple-exposure/id440563481

      Scott & Rich talk about the Lytro camera (including its role in time-lapse) as well as the new Lightroom 4 Beta.  A good overview of where things are going in 2012 is shared.

      Comments

      Great Story on Photo-realism Painting

      The folks over at NPR have a great article on Photorealism.
      "Can you guess which one is a photo and which one is a painting?
      Quartet by Ralph Goings
      If you're going to do a painting that looks exactly like a photo, why even paint it? When asked this question in a written Q & A, photorealist painter and octogenarian Ralph Goings responded, "What I'm about is making paintings, and my camera is one of the tools I use. It's the artist's job to take the painting beyond the photograph."
      Keep reading the entire article
      here.
      Comments

      Merge to HDR Pro Command – UAP 259



      Instructor Richard Harrington demonstrates how to use the Merge to HDR Pro Command to create high dynamic range images.

      Be sure to also check out the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5

      This post sponsored by iStockphotoSave 10%Get a Free Audio Track
      Comments

      Avoid Lens Flare by Flagging Your Lens


      While the sun is generally incredibly useful to photographers, it can occasionally be annoying. If the sun hits your lens at an undesirable angle, you can end up with spots or flares that ruin a shot. Flares generally take on a geometric shape, and may be easy to miss while recording. Additionally, a flare can significantly reduce the amount of contrast and saturation in your image.

      flare1

      The flare is typically caused by a very bright light sources (it most cases the sun). Flares are far more common in zoom lenses as they have multiple surfaces that are prone to light scatter. With a little practice you’ll learn to spot flares quickly. Getting rid of flares just requires a few strategies and modifications to your shooting style.

      One way to prevent lens flare is to block the light. Typically the flare is caused by light entering from the side of the frame. This light is rarely needed for a proper exposure and can be blocked. If using a tripod, you can place your body to the side of the lens to serve as a wall. You can also reach out with a hat off to the side to block the light.

      flare5
      I used a Rogue FlashBender to protect the lens from additional flare while shooting on a bright day.


      You can of course use other devices to block unwanted light. I’ll often attach a Rogue FlashBender right to my lens (http://www.expoimaging.com). These flexible cards are normally used to shape an off-camera flash, but I find the built in flexible support rods bendable surface works well to flag a troubling flare.

      Get more tips here –
      Want Better Photos or Video? Avoid Lens Flares


      This post sponsored by iStockphotoSave 10%Get a Free Audio Track

      Comments

      Creating a Timelapse or Stop-Motion Movie with Photoshop Extended

      Many photographers are experimenting with creating time-lapse or stop motion animations with their cameras. To do this, the camera is typically placed on a secure tripod and a series of still photos is taken with their camera of a scene. Typically teh photos are taken at regular intervals.

      1. Organize your frames You’ll need between 12 and 30 images for each second of animation, so chances are you’ll have a lot of source material. Make sure all the images are in one folder and that they are named sequentially. If needed, you can use the Batch Rename command in Adobe Bridge to fix any naming issues. Files should be named similar to frame001, frame002, frame003, and so on.

      Sequence1

      2. Open your animation When you’re ready, it’s time to open the image sequence in Photoshop. Choose File > Open and navigate to your folder that contains the image sequence files.

      3. Import a sequence
      Select only the first frame of animation (selecting more than one frame will disable the animation). Make sure the Image Sequence option is checked. Click Open to import the sequenced frames.

      1. Sequence2


      4. What speed?
      The next dialog box asks you to specify a frame rate. All of the standard video frame rates are offered. Check with your video editing software to determine which rate you need for a particular project.

      Sequence3
      5. Check playback You can use the Animation panel to check your animated movie. When satisfied, you can choose File > Export > Render Video.

      This post sponsored by iStockphotoSave 10%Get a Free Audio Track

      Comments

      HDR is Not a Bad Word

      I'm constantly surprised how much I hear people complaining about HDR (High Dynamic Range) Photography. Many feel its a phase or a fad… something that's over done.

      HDR is in this strictest sense, the merging of multiple exposures to show a wider dynamic range than a traditional camera can capture. It can be used to create photorealistic images that closer match what the eye sees. It can also be pushed for an artistic effect.

      I'd like to offer five reasons why HDR photography is a useful tool that you should seriously consider adding to your toolset.

      1. Lowlight Images

      When working in tough lighting conditions, HDR Photography really comes through. This image was created by merging 3 exposures. It was shot hand-held at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC at 10:30 pm. Need to shoot in lowlight, try HDR.

      Lincoln


      2. Dramatic Sepiatones and Black and Whites

      Do you want to create black and white photos that really pop? How about truly dynamic sepiatones? I find that the use of HDR gives greater depth to my tones and makes more compelling images.

      church



      3. Details are Revealed

      If you have architectural details that need to come through, HDR works wonders. I took this photo laying on the floor shooting up into the ceiling of a church. The subtleties of the architecture really stand out and I enjoy poring if the finer details of the original artist.

      Statue


      4. Painterly Effects are Fun

      The use of HDR toning can create a painterly like image. These options can be fun with certain images and really open up narrative approaches.

      rapunzel



      5. The General Public Loves HDR

      While photographers may complain… the general public loves HDR. The colors pop, the images are compelling… there's just something that stands out.

      seattle

      This is one of my most popular photos. Gets great reactions and comments from just about all folks. It's several images merged together. Here's how I made it in fact.

      results




      So love it or hate it… you should really give HDR a try. Have a look at my other blog – Triple Exposure –
      www.3exposure.com – which covers the topic in-depth.

      Comments

      A Little Warmth for Winter

      Fire Dancer by Richard Harrington (RichardHarrington)) on 500px.com
      Fire Dancer by Richard Harrington

      Hope this image brings you a little warmth this winter.

      Focal Length — 27 mm
      Shutter Speed — 2.5 sec.
      Aperture — 18
      ISO/Film — 1600
      CategoryPerforming Arts


      Comments

      Trends for the Photography Indutry

      I spend part of my career speaking at industry conferences. This gives me an opportunity to see who’s exhibiting, as well as talk to vendors and photographers to see what’s on their minds. I wanted to quickly share five things that I’ve noticed popping up more and more. Consider adding these areas to your service offerings to expand business opportunity:
      ripple

      3D Photography

      Right now, this is actually starting as a consumer trend. We’re seeing cameras like the Sony Bloggie 3D as well as some mobile phones starting to pick things up. But 3D is on the rise and I expect things like iPad, phone, and computer displays to not be far behind. If you’re into product or location photography, give it some serious thought.
      • You should also check out lenticular printing such as Snapily.com

      Video

      I know for some this is old news… but interest continues to skyrocket. My dSLR classes at Photoshop World sold out in record time. I was amazed at how many people in the photography world are interested in video and have clients willing to pay.

      Time-lapse Photography

      A close cousin to video is the art of time-lapse photography. In this case the photographer shoots several stills sequentially using a timer or intervalometer. An exposure can be taken as often as every second, but often longer intervals are used to show the passing of time. There is high demand for time-lapse photography within the stock community and it’s a heck of a lot of fun.

      Metal Printing

      One of the most popular output options these days is metal printing. Whether it’s large sizes for walls to smaller panels for installations, you’ll find that many vendors are now offering this service. Two things to think of – first shop around… because this is a new service… prices are vary wildly. Second, most printers tell me to reduce the contrast and saturation a bit as the metal will intensify both.
      Comments

      Save Your Photos for Web and Mobile Delivery

      I frequently see other photographers struggle in preparing their files for the Internet.  Some make files that are ridiculously big and take forever to download.  Others accidentally resize or flatten layers during the process and damage their files.  But I understand, you probably didn’t study to be a web developer.
      Fortunately, Photoshop provides a powerful command for compressing images and previewing the results: the Save For Web & Devices command.
      1.    Open an image in Adobe Photoshop.
      2.    Choose File > Save For Web & Devices.
      Save-for-Web-1-300x219

      3.    The Save For Web & Devices dialog box offers several important options for optimization and preview:
      • Tools. If you can’t see the entire image, you can use the Zoom tool to make the image more visible. Additionally, you can use the Hand tool (or hold down the spacebar) to drag and navigate around the image.
      • Optimization tabs. By clicking the four tabs at the top, you can choose to view the Original image, an Optimized view, 2-Up for two versions of the image side by side, or 4-Up for four versions of the image side by side. Being able to compare optimized images helps you choose the right format and compression settings.
      • Image Optimization Info. The area below each image in the Save For Web & Devices dialog box gives you optimization information. You can see the current optimization applied, the projected file size, and the estimated download time based on a selected modem connection speed.
      Save-for-Web-2-300x80

      4.    You’ll likely need to further reduce the file size for Internet delivery. The first area to tackle is the actual image size in pixels. In the Image Size field type in a Height of 600 pixels, so the image can integrate easily into the Web page (even with a screen resolution of 1024 x 768, a height of 600 would allow the image to display without scrolling up and down). Press the Tab key to exit the field and apply the resize value.
      Save-for-Web-3-300x77

      5.    The file size has been reduced, but it’s hard to see the effects of the compression. Set the image magnification view to 100%.

      6.    Change the amount of Compression by either changing the preset (from High to Medium, for example) or adjusting the Quality amount.
      Save-for-Web-4-300x164

      7.    Click Save to specify a location for the saved file and then write a compressed Web-ready version. The original file will remain untouched, and its resolution and quality will be identical to its state when you launched the Save For Web & Devices command.

      For more on mastering Photoshop, check out my book
      Understanding Adobe Photoshop.
      Comments

      Need a Drobo? I've Got a Deal for You (Valid 11/26 Only)

      We use a lot of Drobo products in my office… and I use them at home too. They make some great storage units for keeping data safe.
      We've kept in touch with Drobo providing feedback on features and performance (fortunately they're a good listener).



      I also got them to offer up two great deals
      (valid on Saturday, November 26 only).
      We edit most of the video in our offices off Drobo Pros or the Drobo B800i units. Our graphics department also uses the Drobo FS units to share files. I store my photo library on two Drobo S units at home.

      drobo-s

      Drobo S

      • Creative pros and photographers.
      • Can also work for many video formats
      • 5 drive bays (Fill with your own drives)
      • eSATA, FireWire 800, USB 3.0

      List Price $799.00

      Discount Code -$300
      RHEDBF

      Rebate - $100 (
      http://info.drobo.com/l/2552/2011-09-23/BEL52)

      Final Cost $399 (That's Half Off)
      Code is valid starting 12:01 am 11/26/11 only for 24 hours

      drobopro_240x368

      Drobo Pro

      • Creative pros and photographers. Works well for video workflows too.
      • Single-computer storage for creative professionals and small business
      • 8 drive bays
      • Gigabit Ethernet for iSCSI, FireWire 800, USB 2.0
      • I prefer Gigabit Ethernet for video editing (very fast)

      List Price $1,499.00

      Discount Code -$500
      RHEDBF
      Code is valid starting 12:01 am 11/26/11 only for 24 hours

      Rebate - $150 (
      http://info.drobo.com/l/2552/2011-09-23/BEL52)

      Final Cost $849 (That's Almost Half Off)



      Also, be sure to follow me on Twitter and Facebook


      Follow Drobo too…

      We'll have a contest coming up in a few weeks.

      Comments

      New Digital Camera Support Added to Mac

      screen-shot-2011-11-12-at-4-42-21-pm

      Apple just released the Digital Camera RAW compatibility Update 3.9. Here’s the list of which new cameras are added to the Mac  platform.

      • Canon PowerShot S100
      • Nikon 1 J1
      • Nikon 1 V1
      • Nikon COOLPIX P7100
      • Olympus PEN E-PL1s
      • Olympus PEN E-PL3
      • Olympus PEN E-PM1
      • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-FZ150
      • Sony Alpha NEX-5N
      • Sony Alpha SLT-A65
      • Sony Alpha SLT-A77

      Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 3.9 is 7.20 MB and requires Mac OS X 10.6.8 or OS X 10.7.2 or later.

      This post sponsored by iStockphotoSave 10%Get a Free Audio Track

      Comments

      The Impact of the Camera Phone and Citizen Journalism

      iStock_000007327317Small
      photo – istockphoto

      While much justifiable criticism has been levied against the evolution of cellphone cameras, there is a tremendous beneficiary… journalism.  We now have a literal global network of camera operators with the ability to capture newsworthy events and transmit usable photos.

      Many photographers dismiss this technological shift. After all, how can a point-and-shoot (especially a low quality one at that) take the place of a modern DSLR with a selection of lenses? The answer is easy… speed and mobility.

      Let’s accept that a modern smartphone has a camera that is technically capable of producing an image that is usable by most news and editorial outlets. Here’s what smartphones have that most DSLRs do not.  Hopefully camera manufacturers and others can push the evolution forward (and yes, evolution these days happens in the consumer space far quicker and more often than the pro equipment segment).

      • Data network. First and foremost is the ability to publish on demand.  First often matters when it comes to news… the ability to shoot and tweet/Facebook/share is the key factor here.  Why are WiFi connections in pro cameras so far between and so “stapled-on?”
      • Geotagging. Photos from mobile devices are tagged with essential metadata right in camera.  No need for another adapter plugged into your camera.  GPS data as well as relevant date info is automatically captured. This makes it easier to search and discover new images by those interested in finding them.  Location-based search is already throughly integrated into both the Google and Bing search engines.
      • Compelling and optimized software. Nearly every top software company has some amazing offerings in the app space.  Whether it’s Adobe Photoshop Express (or the newer Touch), nik’s Snapseed, or Photogene… full-featured editing apps allow for cropping, adjusting, toning, and repairing of digital photos immediately.
      • Location-aware updates. The fact that those in a breaking news situation can actually read updates is critical.  The real-time feedback of services like Twitter help those concerned with documenting events find the story and often interact with others.
      • Helper applications. From maps, to sun tables, to weather guides… it’s all there.  How a modern photographer could shoot without a smartphone is a valid question.

      So…  will professional digital photography evolve?  Why not allow the tethering of your smart phone to your camera.  Couldn’t Nikon, Canon and others offer intelligent apps that tie your phone to your camera?  Couldn’t journalists and others push to a tablet for basic touchup then publish without having to lug a laptop?

      As we move closer and closer to digital only delivery for our news and periodicals… the DSLR may go the way of the designer.  The quick and the agile will evolve and survive while the rest become extinct.

      Want to see the impact on video journalists? Read this –
      http://www.theatlanticwire.com/business/2011/11/cnn-photojournalists-lose-jobs-cheaper-better-cameras/44906/

      Comments

      Free Webcast with Photographer Joe McNally


      center

      Get a unique perspective on the man who has inspired so many photographers. On Wednesday, November 16 at 6pm EST, KelbyTraining.com will be hosting a very special free webcast event - A Day With Joe McNally - hosted by Scott Kelby & Joe McNally.

      During this live event, you will watch the premiere of A Day with Joe McNally along with Scott and Joe, in its entirety, absolutely free. In between segments, Joe will answer your questions live via the liveblog or on Twitter with the #AskJoeM hashtag. Don’t miss your chance to spend the day with someone who American Photo magazine lists as one of the 100 Most Important People in Photography and described as "perhaps the most versatile photojournalist working today". This is a rare opportunity to learn the photography secrets and insights from one of the world’s premier photographers.

      REGISTER FOR FREE –
      http://kelbytraining.com/webcast

      Comments

      Greatest Halloween Costume Ever (A Live Camera)

      Making of the Camera Costume from Tyler Card on Vimeo.



      Here's a great Halloween costume

      Everything works from the LCD screen, built-in flash, and shutter release button.

      This post sponsored by iStockphotoSave 10%Get a Free Audio Track
      Comments

      Adobe Sneak Peek – Image Deblurring



      In this video demo, Jue Wang will show you a sneak peek of a potential new feature that allows users to remove blurriness from digital photos caused by camera shake while the pictures were being taken.

      Rich's Take:
      • This will change everything
      • I still believe in shooting right, but 99% of people I know would benefit

      This post sponsored by iStockphotoSave 10%Get a Free Audio Track
      Comments

      A Time Lapse Tribute To Steve Jobs - Made From Post-it Notes

      In the category of sounds weird but is actually quite cool, we have a time-lapse film put together of a recent mural built from Post-It notes.  It's a portrait of Steve Jobs built by a team of artists.

      302416_2541967066521_1174046364_2998757_1736682124_n


      The whole project was created using:

      • 4001 post-its
      • 400 m of ducktape
      • 6 hours of work
      • Filmed with an iPhone4
      • Edited with iMovie on a MacBook Air


      Comments

      How My iPhone Saves My Time-lapse & Video Shoots

      I have an app for my iPhone and iPad that saves my bacon time after time.

      I present to you, the essential and indispensable
      Sun Seeker: 3D Augmented Reality Viewer By ozPDA

      You see, I often find it difficult to know exactly where the sun is going to be when shooting time-lapse. When will it rise and even more importantly… WHERE!?!

      3d_ssmap_ss

      See my full review over at 3Exposure.com – http://3exposure.com/2011/09/19/how-my-iphone-saves-my-time-lapse-shoots/

      This post sponsored by iStockphotoSave 10%Get a Free Audio Track


      Comments

      Two Down & Dirty Techniques to Make Your HDR Photos Pop

      hdr-pop


      Like your HDR images? Want them to pop more? In this
      3Exposure tutorial, I show you how the Find Edges Command, a Black & White Adjustment Layer and blending modes can take your image from wow… to WOW!

      These techniques are easy and fast so take 4 minutes and extend your skill set.
      Check it out at 3Exposure.com!

      This post sponsored by iStockphotoSave 10%Get a Free Audio Track

      Comments

      Carry It… Check It… Rent It…

      baggage
      Photo courtesy iStockphoto/Mathieu

      While I’m not a road warrior, I easily log 50 flights a year for my job. I’ve had to travel with equipment all over the world for both photo and video projects.  Traveling just gets more and more expensive these days.  Here are a few rules that I apply to getting there safely with my sanity and equipment intact.

      Carry It

      I always carry these things onto the plane.
      • A roll-on bag with all my lenses and camera bodies. I have had luggage stolen, the thieves know what gear bags look like.
      • A laptop shoulder bag. With laptop, power supply, 2 TB of portable storage, and spare cables for all items.
      • The Internet. I have an iPad, an iPhone, and a Wireless Modem. Why do I have 3 internet connections at all times? Because its cheaper than paying for WIFI at the airport and hotel.  Plus its much more reliable than counting on clients and coffee shops.
      • A change of clothes. Because your bag will get lost at the worst time

      Check It

      When it comes to checked luggage, here are some tips to try to stretch your budget.
      • Weigh your bags. Weigh your bags before you fly.  A simple bathroom scale is worth keeping near your gear.
      • Prepay. Some airlines offer annual passes for baggage, while others give you a free bag with their branded credit card.
      • Choose wisely. One of my favorite airlines is Virgin America.  Not just for their lovely service and planes (with Internet), but for their $25 per bag and up to 10 bags policy.
      • Pack a bag. Overweight bags are more expensive than checking another bag.  I carry a very lightweight bag inside my suitcase for “overflow.”
      • Skycaps are your friend. Those great folks out front of their airport are often nicer than the folks inside.  Just walk up and hand them a five or ten dollar bill with your driver’s license.

      Rent It

      Don’t feel you have to lug all your gear with you.  All those bags can sure add up.
      • Hire local. Find a local crew person or assistant for the market you’re traveling to. These can be a lighting assistant or someone to help with gear on the shoot.
      • Find a peer. Use the ASMP Find a Photographer app or site to find a photographer to rent gear from. For video crews try the Creative COW services directory.
      • Look for a grip house. We typically rent lighting equipment and support gear. from a grip house, which are used by the video and motion picture industries.
      Why all this hubbub?  These days every dollar counts.  Clients don’t really look at your rate plus expenses, they just see the bottom line.  In my experience, the better a traveler I am, the more money left over to go in my pocket.

      Comments

      My Favorite Browser Bookmarks and Why

      links_23

      Photo by iStockphoto/JuSunview

      Clientcopia – www.clientcopia.com
      This site lets me know that everyone has crazy clients. Good for a laugh and a pick me up.

      Basecamp HQ – www.basecamphq.com
      I use this online project management tool for both my companies. This keeps me organized and ensures open communication with my clients.

      Apple Trailers – www.apple.com/trailers
      I’m a movie junkie. Plus this is an excellent way to see the best lit, best composed shots in the whole movie.

      Rafael Concepcion – www.aboutrc.com/blog
      RC is a helpful author and podcaster who shares his discoveries in great posts. He’s a natural storyteller and very passionate.

      Twitter – www.twitter.com
      I follow a great group of photographers and media pros. This is the water cooler/bar for the digital age. I get news, gossip, and strong opinions. Feel free to follow @rhedpixel and share any news you have with me as well.

      Photo Focus – www.PhotoFocus.com
      This site is an extensive collection of articles and resources. There are daily posts and I truly enjoy the breadth of coverage.

      Screenr – www.Screenr.com
      If I need to record a quick tutorial or show a colleague a technique, Screenr is great.

      Creative COW – www.creativecow.net
      This is where I go to get all of my video questions answered. You’ll find active forums and extensive selection of tutorials and podcasts.

      Kelby Training – www.kelbytraining.com
      This site offers a large selection of classes and tutorials by some of the top photographers and photoshop users in the world.

      Mac Rumors – www.macrumors.com
      I’m an Apple enthusiast. I like to know what’s going on as well as what might be going on in the Apple ecosystem.

      Photoshop Disasters – www.psdisasters.com
      This is another site that’s good for a laugh. It’s also educational as you can learn from other’s mistakes.

      Triple Exposure – www.3exposure.com
      This one is a blog I share ... but that doesn’t mean I don’t read it every day. There are great comments and resources all about my three favorite styes of photography – panoramic, HDR, and time-lapse.

      How about you? What are your must read sites? I’m always looking for more.

      This post is sponsored by iStockphoto

      Comments

      Apple Updates Digital Camera RAW for New Cameras

      image.jsp

      About Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 3.8
      This update adds RAW image compatibility for the following cameras to Aperture 3 and iPhoto '11:
      • Konica Minolta DiMAGE A200
      • Olympus PEN E-P3
      • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-G3
      • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF3
      • Samsung NX11
      • Samsung NX100
      • Sony Alpha NEX-C3
      • Sony Alpha SLT-A35
      For more information on supported RAW formats, see http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4757
      Comments

      Using Multiple Cameras For Time-lapse Photography

      20_01_img_0392

      I see a lot of folks try to flip cameras as they go from one model to another. I know for many, the economic realty is a need to trade-in or re-sell gear in order to upgrade. The truth however is that the amount you’ll see for used gear may not be worth as much as you’d hope. I subscribe to the belief of putting the gear to work.
      When it comes to shooting time-lapse, a second camera body (or even a third) can really come in handy.

      • A second body can be set to a different ISO or aperture when shooting tough exposures (like sunrise or sunset)
      • You can shoot different focal lengths on each body to create dramatically different shots. You can get your master shot and some additional angles all at once.
      • A spare body can be especially useful if you are shooting content that requires simultaneous coverage like an event or live process, such as at a construction site.
      • Shoot raw on one camera and JPEG on the other.
      • You can shoot at different intervals to produce different looking footage

      Chances are you have at least a few lenses in your bag… put them into use on that next shoot.

      Be sure to check out the Triple Exposure website –
      www.3exposure.com – for more on time-lapse.

      Comments

      My Portfolio gets Miniaturized

      I recently ordered a collection of new Moo Minicards for Photoshop World.

      What's cool is they let you do business cards with
      100 different images on the back. Photogs love em as they're a great way to show off their work.

      Here are my 100 selects… hoping they all work at a small size.

      100 Minicards En Route by Richard Harrington (RichardHarrington)) on 500px.com
      100 Minicards En Route by Richard Harrington

      Comments

      Finding the Shot – New Podcast Epsiode

      banner3

      Welcome to the next episode of the Triple Exposure podcast.
      Scott & Rich talk about what scenes lend themselves best to time-lapse, HDR and panoramic photography.

      You can direct-
      download the MP3 here.

      You can subscribe on iTunes here - 
      http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/triple-exposure/id440563481


      Comments

      Dealing With Crowds in Panoramic Photos

      huntington-beach

      I seem to like to make things hard on myself.

      • Lots of moving subjects (hundreds of people in fact)
      • Shifting horizons and foreground (waves)
      • Lack of a tripod (shot thus handheld in about 60 seconds)

      But the moment was worth capturing.  I was in Huntington Beach (my birthplace in fact) and I really wanted a photo to capture the mood.  Of course it was just about noon (the light was awful).  That’s okay… the whole reason I enjoy Photoshop is the process of developing the picture in my mind’s eye.

      Head over to
      www.3exposure.com and see how I put the shot together.

      Comments

      How to Sign Your Work – Adding a Digital Signature To Your Photographs

      A popular trend these days is to sign your images when posting online. The thought is to treat the image more like it was being shown in a gallery and less like pixel dust in the wind. The process is really pretty easy to do. I’d also like to state that this is a much more attractive way to watermark a photo.

      bike_wheel2

      Head over to Triple Exposure to see the free tutorial – http://3exposure.com/2011/08/03/how-to-sign-your-work-–-adding-a-digital-signature/


      ______________________________________________________________________


      If you'd like to follow my public Facebook page – click here – http://www.facebook.com/RichHarringtonStuff
      More of a Twitter person? Then click here –
      http://www.twitter.com/rhedpixel

      Comments

      A Photoshop HDR Workflow Example




      In this video, photographer and trainer Rich Harrington takes 3 images and works with them to complete a single HDR image with multiple effects.

      Combining the images and them post processing within Photoshop Rich gives us a real world example of photographic workflow.

      For more tutorials be sure to check out
      Tip Squirrel

      Comments

      Lightening A Dark Photo

      Drk_ba1

      This is a guest post by the talented Janine Smith who is one of the best photo restorationists I know.

      As a photo restorationist I'm given many types of photographs in all manner of conditions. Sometimes the image can be very dark and given to me as a 'lost cause'. This isn't always the case, here’s just one way to lighten them up.


      Read More...
      Comments

      Repairing An Aperture Library


      This is a guest post from Scott Engel

      I want to thank Richard for giving me the opportunity to be a guest blogger. I am a freelance photographer specializing in wildlife, but I do a lot of zoo photography as well. In a past life I also worked for Apple Retail as a Creative/Trainer and I hold an Aperture 3 Certification.

      Aperture is a wonderful application. Sometimes, however, you might encounter an error with your library and it will not open. Aperture has a great set of troubleshooting tools in case your library becomes corrupt or fails to load.

      1. While holding down the Option and Command keys, click on Aperture to launch it.

      2. There are three tools to help you repair a library:
      ap_repair
      • The first choice, Repair Permissions, will address a majority of issues and is the fastest.
      • The second Choice is to Repair Database. It takes a little bit longer but it’s more thorough.
      • If your library needs some extra attention, then choose Rebuild Database. This is the most time consuming, but is very thorough.

      3. Click Repair to make the fix.


      You can contact Scott on Facebook at
      www.facebook.com/Engelimages | Twitter @Engelimages
      He also has a small photo gallery at
      www.engelimages.com
      Comments

      The Eight Step Grunge Look

      This is a guest post by the talented Glyn Dewis (who is letting me take more of a family vacation).

      BEFORE_AFTER
      The images above show the 'out of camera' and 'final edit' versions of a photograph that I took of a 'Rough Sleeper' when out on a photo walk in the coastal town of Brighton, UK, and in this post I want to show you each of the stages I went through in Photoshop to achieve the final look.
      Read More...
      Comments

      Luminosity Sharpening 3 Ways

      Guest post By Michael Hoffman

      The Luminosity Blend Mode allows us to use the brightness values from one layer to make adjustments to the brightness of underlying layers, without creating unwanted shifts in the hue of the underlying layers.
      This can come in useful with our sharpening workflow.the image below is an example of an image that was sharpened heavily, and the resulting halo along the edge boundary. This has developed some weird color shifts as a result of the sharpening:

      LumSharpening01_thumb1
      Let’s take a look at three ways to use the principles with Luminosity Mode blending to eliminate the color shifting, and leave the hue intact as we add brightness and darkness along the edges to sharpen our images. You may have seen recommendations that you convert your image from RGB to Lab and sharpen the L channel, then convert back to RGB. This technique will achieve essentially the same result, without the conversion – and without having to flatten a multi-layer image.
      Read More...
      Comments

      Vintage Photo + High Dynamic Range = Cool Look

      Vintage Photo + High Dynamic Range from Richard Harrington on Vimeo.



      Here's a recent tutorial from my new website Triple Exposure –
      www.3exposure.com

      In this tutorial, Rich Harrington shows you how to combine modern technology with vintage source materials to create a retro look.

      Tools covered:
      • Merge to HDR Pro
      • Lens Correction
      • Black and White Adjustment
      • Cropping
      • Blending Modes
      • Layer Masks
      • Filters

      Be sure to also head over to
      Triple Exposure to learn how to win a copy of Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium.

      Comments

      A Free Four-day Photoshop Class from Lesa Snider


      PSD-11Q3-640x360px_1

      Would you like to take a great Photoshop class that goes really deep? One that you can wear your pajamas for? One that's 100% free to watch live? Be sure to check out Lesa Snider's Photoshop CS 5 Intensive class. The free class runs September 20–23 (a Tuesday-Friday Workshop).

      " In this special workshop, you'll dig into Photoshop CS5 with Lesa Snider, author of Photoshop CS5: The Missing Manual. There is so much to cover in Photoshop CS5 that we need almost a week to cover everything. In this special 4-day workshop (Tuesday - Friday, from 9:00-4:00, Pacific Time), you'll dig into Photoshop CS5 with Lesa Snider, internationally acclaimed instructor and author. Lesa is informative yet entertaining with a unique way of explaining difficult concepts so you understand the "why" behind the "how". Get ready to spend a fun, high-energy week digging into the power of Photoshop."

      Be sure to sign up in advance before the class fills up. –
      http://creativelive.com/courses/photoshop-cs5-lesa-snider

      Comments

      Creating Time-lapse Movies with Raw Files

      Using Raw Photos in a Time-lapse from Richard Harrington on Vimeo.

      In this Triple Exposure tutorial, Rich Harrington shows you how to use raw files in a time-lapse movie. Learn how to access Adobe Camera Raw from right within Adobe After Effects.



      For more on time-lapse, be sure to check out Triple Exposure at
      www.3exposure.com.

      Comments

      Use HDR Toning for Dramatic Impact on Photos

      HDR Toning for Dramatic Impact from Richard Harrington on Vimeo.

      In this tutorial, Rich Harrington shows you how to use the HDR toning command to create texture and depth using only a single exposure.



      To learn more about HDR, visit Triple Exposure – www.3Exposure.com

      Comments

      Where did the Zacuto Z-Finder come from?

      3 Exposure - NAB 2011 Zacuto Booth from Richard Harrington on Vimeo.



      Learn the origins of the Zacuto Z-Finder from company founder Steve Weiss. This video was recorded at NAB 2011 for the
      www.3exposure.com website.

      Comments

      How to Batch Process Photos with the Image Processor

      image_processor
      When working in time-lapse or panoramic photography, chances are that you have a lot of photos to deal with. Maybe its a bunch of Raw files that you want to develop to the same settings, or high resolution images that you want to down sample. The great news is that Photoshop includes a useful script to get more done in less time.

      The Image Processor differs from the Batch command in that you don’t have to first create an action. The Image Processor script can be more flexible than the Batch command. The Image Processor can be used for any of the following tasks:
      • To convert a set of files to JPEG, PSD, or TIFF format. You can also convert files simultaneously to all three formats.
      • To process a set of Camera Raw files using the same Camera Raw options.
      • To resize images to fit within a specified pixel dimension.
      • To embed a color profile into images or convert files to sRGB and save them as JPEG images for the Web.
      • To include copyright metadata within the processed images.

      To read the whole article for free, visit the
      Triple Exposure bloghttp://3exposure.com/2011/07/06/how-to-batch-process-photos-with-the-image-processor/

      Comments

      New Triple Exposure Podcast Episodes

      • 3expodcast
      Have you checked out the new Triple Exposure podcast I am doing with Scott Bourne (@ScottBourne)? The show tackles all sorts of topics related to Time-lapse, High Dynamic Range, and Panoramic photography. It's a totally free show and I hope you check it out.

      Free Podcast Feed on iTunes Triple Exposure iTunes Podcast Feed

      Non iTunes Free Non iTunes Podomatic Page
      Non iTunes RSS Feed

      Comments

      Photofocus Podcast Tackles Tough Questions

      photofocuslogo
      I had the chance to be the guest host on the Photofocus podcast recently. Scott Bourne produces a great show that answers questions from the audience. We dug deep on some great questions. Be sure to listen to the show and you can learn about:

      • Panoramic Film Cameras vs. Digital
      • Arial Photography
      • Transporting Hard Drives
      • Cell Phone Cameras Replacing DSLRs
      • Posting Photographs Similar to Another Photographers’
      • Lenses or Camera Bodies – Where to Invest?
      • Filters for Beach Photography
      • Video Camcorders vs. DSLRs
      • Color Calibration for the Web
      • Video Stabilization with a Monopod

      You can check the show out here –
      http://photofocus.com/2011/06/15/photofocus-podcast-episode-78/

      Comments

      My Free Ebook on Adobe Camera Raw

      This is a re-post... but I was asked to share it again. Here's a free (and really good) way to learn all about the Adobe Camera Raw plug-in. This is a bonus eBook I wrote to go along with the book Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5. Its yours for free... I hope it helps.

      UAP Using Camera Raw


      Be sure to also check out the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5

      Here's a nice review of the book too –
      http://www.mymac.com/2011/02/book-review-understanding-adobe-photoshop-cs5/

      Comments

      How to Make Your Camera Work with Adobe Camera Raw

      I recently came across a great post from one of the developers on the Photoshop team. It's called "Why doesn't my version of Photoshop or Lightroom support my camera?" by Jeff Tranberry.

      Jeff offers a logical workflow that explains how to stay current, how to confirm the status of your camera, as well as a workaround using the Adobe DNG converter. It's a great article and worth the read –
      http://blogs.adobe.com/crawlspace/2011/03/why-doesnt-my-version-of-photoshop-or-lightroom-support-my-camera.html


      Speaking of DNG, be sure to watch this useful video which explains the format.





      Comments

      Better 360˚ Panoramic Photos Using Photoshop Automation

      I've posted a new article over at the Triple Exposure website on 360˚ Panoramic Images.

      figure-09_39


      “As many explore panoramic photography, they off stop short (at least of making a full 360˚ arc). The truth is that its gotten much easier to make a fully actualized 360˚ image. If enough photos are taken, then a large panoramic image can be made. These photos can then be turned into an interactive panoramic for the web or brought into Adobe After Effects to serve as a backdrop for chroma key footage.”

      You can read the whole thing at –
      http://3exposure.com/2011/06/10/better-360˚-panoramic-photos-using-photoshop-automation/

      Be sure to also download the special Photoshop Action mentioned in the article.

      Comments

      This Week in Photography #198

      thumb.php

      Image by: Rakkhi // Creative Commons
      On this episode of TWiP, can you tell the difference between the Las Vegas Statue of Liberty and the real one in New York? If so, the US Postal Service could use your help. onOne introduces layers to Lightroom, and Bruce Clarke sits down with photographer Matthew Jordan Smith to pick his brain about all things photography.

      Hosts: Frederick Van Johnson, Alex Lindsay, Richard Harrington, Derrick Story
      http://www.thisweekinphoto.com/twip-198-viva-las-vegas/



      TWiP #198 – Viva Las Vegas
      Comments

      Vigilant Lincoln

      Lincoln

      A nighttime HDR – Vigilant Lincoln by Richard Harrington

      • Nikon D7000
      • 3 Exposures with bracketing
      • f/2.8
      • 1/200 s
      • ISO 1600
      • Nikon 70-200mm @ 70mm
      • Post-processed with Photoshop – Merge to HDR Pro

      Learn more about HDR at Triple Exposure –
      www.3exposure.com.

      Comments

      Triple Exposure is Live!

      3exbanner

      Are you into Time-lapse, HDR, or Panoramic photography? I've launches a new website with the incredible Scott Bourne called Triple Exposure –
      www.3exposure.com.

      Photography has been around a long time. One of the reasons for that is the constant innovation and improvement in technique and craft surrounding photography. Another reason is the invention of interesting styles or genres. Enter time lapse, HDR and panoramic photography. While HDR is the new kid on the block, time lapse has been possible since the first motion picture and panoramic photography has been around in some form since the 1840s.

      Here at Triple Exposure, we’ll cover these three photographic specialties. We’ll offer tips, tricks, reviews, punditry, training videos, podcasts and anything else we can think of that might interest photographers using time lapse, HDR or panoramic photography.

      Be sure to check it out and also follow on Twitter.
      Comments

      Image11 Photo Contest Opens

      415

      The New York chapter of the American Society of Media Photographers has opened the call for entries for Image11. This is a nationwide photo contest which is open to professional, serious amateur and student photographers residing in the United States.
      The rules require the photos were created after January 1, 2010. The deadline for entry submissions is
      May 1, 2011.
      Entry form and full info at
      image-ny.org.
      Here are the
      rules.

      Comments

      HDR Toning Black and White Images

      Rich_Harrington_Photoshop_HDR

      I released a new HDR and Black & White tutorial over at www.TipSquirrel.com.

      From Bridge, through Photoshop’s HDR Pro and then into Photoshop for finishing touches, Rich covers every step of the way.

      Be sure to also check out the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5

      Comments

      Time Lapse Part 1: Gear You'll Need

      cow_tl1

      From the Creative COW DSLR Essentials Podcast, Robbie Carman and Richard Harrington bring you the first in a three-part series on creating time lapse.

      Comments

      ASMP Strictly Business Hits Chicago April 1–3

      SB3_email_header
      I'll be speaking at the final stop for the ASMP Strictly Business 3 conference. It brings together an extraordinary level of industry expertise with some great classes and workshops.

      FULL CONFERENCE DETAILS
      When and Where
      April 1 - 3 Allerton Hotel 701 N. Michigan Ave Chicago, IL
      Hope to see some of you
      there.

      Comments

      Creative HDR with Nik HDR Efex Pro



      DSC3945_HDR16-1024x576

      In this video, Richard Harrington takes a look at an HDR workflow. Using Bridge, HDR Efex Pro and Photoshop he demonstrates techniques and tips for all HDR photography.
      If you’d like to try Nik Sofware HDR Efex Pro there’s a free trial on their
      website.

      Comments

      Color Calibration Tools for Video

      06_19_IMG_6181
      When shooting in the field, it's often worth the effort to calibrate your camera. By manually setting your white balance, you increase the chance of proper color. Each camera is a little different (so look up the specifics in your manual). What we want to talk about now is using a consistent source to white balance during both the production and postproduction stages.

      Here are two tools that are affordable and portable, and can help you calibrate cameras in the field and double-check color balance in post:

      • QPcard (www.qpcard.se). A cheap and easy way to address color calibration is to use a fresh calibration card when shooting. One option is the disposable QPcard. Priced at less than $5 per card, this is a great investment in accurate color. Simply use the adhesive strip to adhere one to your clapboard at the start of each day of shooting, and you’ll have a great source for checking color balance in post. With a white, black, and neutral gray surface, it is very easy to use the Three-Way Color Corrector when color correcting. In most cases, it will only take three to calibrate each camera.
      • Photovision One Shot (www.photovisionvideo.com). This calibration device offers a black, white, and gray stripe to color calibrate. The other side is a white reflector to help bounce light on set. What’s great about it is that it is reusable and can fold to a small size to fit into a camera bag. Various sizes are available, from 6-inch targets to wear around your neck to 34-inch targets for large multicamera events.

      For more on DSLR video, check out
      From Still to Motion.

      Comments

      Your Right to Take Photos of Federal Property

      federal_photo
      Like to take pictures? Well you may have run afoul of shooting photos of federal buildings (which is pretty easy to do in DC where I live). Here's a useful federal directive that you should print out and put in your camera bag.

      Federal Protective Service Information Bulletin of Aug. 2, 2010, emphasizing "the public's right to photograph the exterior of federal facilities" from "publicly accessible spaces such as streets, sidewalks, parks and plazas." It also states that in a field interview, "officers should not seize the camera or its contents, and must be cautious not to give such 'orders' to a photographer to erase the contents of a camera."

      Download it here –
      http://documents.nytimes.com/photographing-federal-buildings-from-public-spaces


      Comments

      Extracting Images in Photoshop CS5



      In this Photoshop tutorial from CreativeCOW.net, Richard Harrington reveals updated features in CS5 to show how to extract an image.

      Be sure to check out my two Photoshop books –
      Photoshop for Video and Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5.

      Comments

      A Good List of Blogs to Try

      SB3_website_header
      Here are some blogs from the great team I'll be speaking with this Spring. These are the blogs of the speakers for Strictly Business 3 – a conference put on by the American Society of Media Photographers. I hope you enjoy.

      2 Good Things - Strategic Career Reinvention with Judy Herrmann
      www.2goodthings.com

      Branding for Creatives with Colleen Wainwright
      communicatrix.com/

      The DAM Book  - Digital Asset Management for Photographers with Peter Krogh
       www.thedambook.com/blog

      Jay Kinghorn's Blog: Multimedia, Workflow and inspiration for visual communicators
      jaykinghorn.com

      Marketing and Stock Photography Consulting with Ellen Boughn
      ellenboughn.com/blog

      Negotiating and Web Marketing with Blake Discher
      groozi.com/

      Journeys of a Hybrid - A still photographer and filmmaker talks about working in both still and motion mediums.
      kellymooneyminutes.wordpress.com

      Digital Marketing Blog with Rosh Sillars
      www.newmediaphotographer.com/

      Marketing for Creatives with Colleen Wainwright
      http://www.virgoguidetomarketing.com/

      Comments

      I'm Speaking at ASMP Strictly Business 3



      ASMP's celebrated conference for working photographers, Strictly Business, is coming soon to a city near you. LA, Philly, and Chicago. January—April, 2011.

      Don’t miss this unique opportunity to bring your business to the next level. Distinguish yourself and your business by attending the American Society of Media Photographer’s Strictly Business 3 Conference, the newest generation of this highly acclaimed series. SB3 offers you a selection of topics to enhance your professionalism and build your business. From copyright registration to social media marketing, negotiating and sales, licensing and pricing, the business of video and much more — you can design the conference to fit your specific needs.
       
      Locations / Dates


      Comments

      An Interview with Rich on the Business of Photography and Video



      I recently had a chance to be a guest on the Typical Shutterbug Podcast. We talked about photography, video, software, and learning

      You can hear the show here for free –
      http://typicalshutterbug.com/wordpress/2010/10/31/tsb23-richard-harrington-and-john-andersson-talk-photography-and-cgi/

      Be sure to check out some of the other great episodes too.

      Comments

      Self Portrait – San Jose, CA

      Comments

      A Great Deal for Organizing Your Media



      A colleague of mine, Peter Krogh has a
      great deal going. His excellent book called The DAM Bool is being bundled with Expression Media. Here are the key facts.

      The DAM Book – In The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers, Peter Krogh updates his ground-breaking book on creating and managing digital photography collection. Peter guides you through the entire digital photography ecosystem, showing you how hardware, software, file formats and workflow practices can work together to keep your images safe, and to let you get the most from your pictures. The second edition has been almost entirely rewritten, updating the material for the changed technical landscape. Chapters were added that covered the use of Lightroom, as well as an entirely new chapter on backup and validation of image files. Peter also covers the use of GPS devices and software to geotag your images.

      Expression Media 2 software – When you buy The DAM Book during the month of October, you'll get a fully-licensed copy Expression Media 2 for free. (A $199 full retail value). Expression Media 2 is the a cross-platform application for managing your digital photos and media. Create easy-to-use catalogs of all your photos, movies, audio files, and many more file types. Expression Media 2 was recently purchased by Phase One from Microsoft.

      Act now to take advantage of this limited time offer – Expires Sunday, October 31.

      Comments

      Organizing Images with Aperture


      In this video you’ll learn to rank and sort images in Aperture. You’ll also learn about contact sheets and Web galleries for client review.
      This a sample of the 6 hours of video included with the book Video Made on a Mac.

      You can also visit the website www.peachpit.com/videomac in order to download sample files.

      Comments

      Learn about Color Correction in Photoshop for Free

      The fine folks at Peachpit Press have posted a free excerpt from the new edition of Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5: The Essential Techniques for Imaging Professionals. In it you'll learn about color correction and enhancement (this particular excerpt will also work in Photoshop CS4).

      Get the PDFColor Correction and Enhancement

      Lesson Files –
      Control-Click or Right-Click on the file name to save the file to your desktop.



      Comments

      Camera Raw Interface – 189 UAP



      Instructor Richard Harrington talks about the native files recorded by your digital SLR camera. He?ll describe what advantages are provided by using a raw file.

      Be sure to also check out the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5
      Comments

      Talent Release Form

      A piece of essential production paperwork is the talent release form. It is generally considered a good idea to obtain a release from each person who appears on camera. The form is your way of proving that the person appeared willingly and does not require additional compensation.

      To make this form truly binding, you should check with a local lawyer to assist you. Laws will vary based on country and state, so this form is merely provided as a suggestion. Once you have your forms locked in, be sure to print out enough and load them onto a clipboard for your shoot.

      If you are taping at a large event, you’ll likely want to explore integrating a general release into the event registration or ticket purchase process. This way you don’t need to worry about capturing releases from all the people who appear on camera. However, you should still get the more detailed release signed for on-camera interviews.

      Get more useful forms (and a whole lot more) by reading
      Video Made on a Mac


      Comments

      Peachpit Photo Club Presents Trey Ratcliff


      On Tuesday, September 28 at 8 p.m. ET, 5 p.m. PT, join Trey Ratcliff, author of A World in HDR for the next Peachpit Photo Club webcast. High dynamic range (HDR) photography lets you capture the myriad colors and levels of light that you can see in the real world, and the results are amazing photographs that run the gamut from super real to surreal. Explore this fantastic realm of photography through the unique vision of renowned travel photographer Trey Ratcliff. Trey will share his phenomenal HDR photographs as well as all the backstory on the adventurous circumstances of their origin. He'll also reveal the techniques he used to get the final shot, and answer your burning questions!
      To keep the creative juices flowing, Photo Club members will receive a fun assignment at the end of the session. Once the assignment is completed, Photo Club members can upload their work to the Peachpit Photo Club Flickr Group where Trey and the Peachpit crew will help critique your work. And of course, there will be a chance for prizes!
      Register now.


      Also, be sure to check out the From Still to Motion webcast while you are there
      Comments

      Panoramic Layout Options

      You can choose from five different layout options when creating a panoramic photo with the Photomerge command. Each method interprets the panoramic photos differently.

      • Auto: With this method, Photoshop first analyzes your source images. It then applies either the Perspective, Cylindrical, and Spherical layout option. Photoshop attempts to choose which method to use that will produce a better photomerge.
      • Perspective: This method creates a composition by designating one of the source images as the center of the panoramic image. Photoshop generally picks the middle image, then transforms the other images around it. Photoshop will stretch and skew images as needed to overlap the layers and blend them together.
      • Cylindrical: The cylindrical layout option works best for creating very wide panoramic images. The source images are overlapped in a way that looks like an unfolded cylinder.
      • Spherical: The spherical option is best-suited for 360 degree panoramas. The images are mapped to the inside of a sphere and can create a seamless image for use in specialty applications like multimedia or animation.
      • Collage: This method only changes rotation or scale in order to overlap the content.
      • Reposition: This method only changes the alignment of images, but does not transform (stretch or skew) any of the source layers.

      Check out our Panoramic Training Here


      Comments

      My 360˚ Panoramic Action



      A while back I made an action that is designed to create a seamless loop for properly shot 360˚ photos. People seem to be unable to find it (as its the number one search result for my site). So here it is again.


      1. Download the action here
      2. Double click the file Panoramicsrev3.atn to load it.
      3. Switch to Photoshop.
      4. Complete your 360˚ panorama using the Photomerge command.
      5. Choose Window > Actions to view the Actions panel.
      6. Select the Seamless Loop action in the Actions panel. If necessary click the disclosure triangle next to the Panoramics set.
      7. When ready, click the Play button at the bottom of the Actions panel. Photoshop runs a series of steps to complete the seamless loop action.
      8. Crop the bottom and top of the panoramic image to taste, but be careful not to adjust the sides of the image.





      Check out our Panoramic Training Here

      Comments

      New Digital Camera Update from Apple

      Apple releases Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 3.3 for Canon Olympus Panasonic, and Sony http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1072


      About Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 3.3
      This update extends RAW image format compatibility to Aperture 3 and iPhoto '09 for the following cameras:
      • Canon PowerShot SX1 IS
      • Olympus E-PL1
      • Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2
      • Panasonic Lumix DMC-G10
      • Samsung NX10
      • Sony Alpha DSLR-A390
      • Sony Alpha NEX-3
      • Sony Alpha NEX-5

      Get it here


      Comments

      Stabilizing Handheld Shots Technique

      If you have to shoot your panoramic images without a tripod, you’ll need to adjust your handheld shooting technique.



      Try wrapping the camera strap around your elbow. This allows you to place tension on the strap so it is taut. The tension is a useful way to constrain the camera movement and make it more an extension of your body.
      1. Hold the camera in front of your body so its strap hangs downward.
      2. Slip your arm through the strap so it goes just past your elbow.
      3. Wrap your hand around the outside edge of the strap and grab the camera body.
      4. Press your elbow into the strap to increase tension on the strap and stabilize the camera.


      To pan the camera smoothly, you’ll need to properly position your body.
      1. Square your body up with your subject.
      2. Spread your feet shoulder-width apart.
      3. Rotate at the waist and twist body while keeping your shoulders and camera in close to your body.


      Check out our Panoramic Training Here

      Comments

      IN-DEPTH HDR PRO in Photoshop CS5



      Get the best HDR output from the updated options in Photoshop CS5.

      Be sure to also check out the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5
      Comments

      One of My New Favorite Sites

      One of my new favorite resource sites is dpBestflow.org produced by the American Society of Media Photographers and funded by the Library of Congress. This site contains a ton of great information about workflow, digital imaging, and photography. It's also totally free.



      The purpose of dpBestflow™ is twofold:
      • To create guidelines for refined production workflows, archiving methods, and best practices for digital photography based on a variety of capture methods and intended image use. The guidelines will be developed on the basis of research, analysis of software products and other tools targeted at professional photographers.
      • To publish the dpBestflow™ as a website open to the public. The adoption of the dpBestflow™ guidelines will be promoted to the professional photography community and the public through programming at industry trade shows and a nationwide series of training events at ASMP chapters, trade shows, and educational institutions.


      Be sure to check out the site... it's really great. –
      www.dpbestflow.org
      Comments

      Five More Timelapse Shots

      Timelapse Technical Demo from Richard Harrington on Vimeo.



      Here are five more shots... I've been experimenting with new techniques. Some subtle and not so subtle things here. Comments welcome.

      Learn how to make timelapse clips
      here.

      Comments

      Seattle Skyline Timelapse



      GEAR USED
      Nikon D300S
      Really Right Stuff L-Bracket and Ballhead
      Manfrotto Tripod
      Nikkor 50 mm 1.8
      Nikon MC-36 Intervalometer

      Processed in After Effects (see tutorial)

      Comments

      Creating Timelapse Movies with a DSLR and After Effects

      Creating Timelapse Movies with a DSLR and After Effects from Richard Harrington on Vimeo.



      Learn how to create Timelapse movies with your DSLR camera and Adobe After Effects. Join Richard Harrington as he shows you how to create pans and zooms while controlling the speed of the shot as well.

      From the book and DVD "From Still to Motion: A photographers guide to creating video with your DSLR."

      Photos by Jim Ball

      Comments

      Photoshop CS5 Puppet Warp



      Learn how to create Puppet Warps in Photoshop CS5.

      Be sure to also check out the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5
      Comments

      Worldwide Photo Walk




      I will be leading a DC-area event for the Worldwide Photo Walk. The event is a fun few hours of shooting pictures and meeting other photographers. There's a few spots left for the July 24th event (it's free).

      Meeting Location & Time
      Vienna Community Center (10:00am - 12:30pm)
      120 Cherry St SE, Vienna, VA- USA

      After the walk, meet at: Church Street Pizza‎- 115 Church Street NE, Vienna

      Sign up here.
      http://worldwidephotowalk.com/walk/vienna-va-usa-vienna-community-center/

      Sign up in your neighborhood too
      http://worldwidephotowalk.com/

      Comments

      Fixing Faded Historical Photos

      A common problem with old black-and-white or sepia-toned photos is that they fade over time. You can use a Levels or Curves adjustment, but both commands often introduce color artifacts into the image. A few extra steps are needed to get the best results.

      1. With the Eyedropper tool, sample the color tint if you want to retain it in the finished piece.

      2. Leave the photo in RGB mode but strip away the color. Choose Image > Adjust > Desaturate or press Shift+Command+U (Shift+Ctrl+U).

      3. Perform a Levels adjustment and restore the white-and-black points. Drag the black Input Levels slider and the white Input Levels slider toward the center.

      4. Add a Solid Color fill layer by choosing Layer > New Fill Layer > Solid Color. Click OK. The Foreground color you previously sampled will load automatically.

      5. Set the Color Fill layer to use the Color blending mode. Adjust the Opacity slider as desired.

      Be sure to also check out the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5

      Comments

      Master iPhoto Dirt Cheap

      I have two iPhoto training titles released today from Peachpit Press and they've lowered the price to $8.99. I am very proud of these and hope you enjoy them. For you pros... its perfect for your family members/parents. These are two very cool titles that I made especially for the iPhoto users out there.

      iPhoto: Fix Your Photos – http://tinyurl.com/iphotofix
      The videos provide easy to follow tutorials that help you fix common problems with pictures. You'll learn how to straighten and crop, adjust dark photos, and bring out the color in your snapshots. You'll also learn how to fix soft focus, red eye, and overexposed photos. Whether you're new to iPhoto or even an experienced user, you'll find useful techniques and powerful shortcuts to get your work done faster. Each lesson includes hands on files so you can work along with the instructor.

      iPhoto: Share Your Photos - http://tinyurl.com/iphotoshare
      The videos provide easy to follow tutorials that help you share your pictures over email or post them online to services including MobileMe, Facebook, and Flickr. You’ll also learn techniques for making slideshows and creating your own blog. Whether you're new to iPhoto or even an experienced user, you’ll find useful techniques and powerful shortcuts to share your photos easily. Each lesson includes hands on files so you can follow along with the instructor.

      Comments

      Merge to HDR Pro & HDR Toning — Photoshop CS5



      Learn how to create true HDR in Photoshop CS5. You'll also learn how to apply HDR toning to any photo.

      Be sure to also check out the new book – Understanding Adobe Photoshop CS5
      Comments

      This Week in Photo – Controversy

      I'm a guest for the new episode of this week in Photography. ControversyFrederick Van Johnson Shoot and get shot! BP gets slippery with photographers...and David duChemin talks ebook publishing.

      Are Cameras the New Guns? – Recent increases in Facebook and YouTube videos that depict police abuse, has given rise to a new trend in law enforcement. It is now illegal in at least three states to record any on-duty police officer. "Illinois, Massachusetts, and Maryland are among the 12 states in which all parties must consent for a recording to be legal unless, as with TV news crews, it is obvious to all that recording is underway."
      Apple Releases the next iPhone – The latest version of the iPhone was announced at WWDC with new features including a hi-res screen, improved 5 mp camera, digital flash, ability to shoot and edit HD video, and a front facing camera for video chat.
      BP's Photo Blockade of the Gulf Oil Spill – According to photographers, BP and government officials are preventing them from photographing the impact of the Deepwater Horizon disaster.
      AFP Suing Photographer It Stole Images From PDN - David Walker - "It's hard to explain a mind-blowing mess like this one, but AFP is suing a Haitian photojournalist for "antagonistic assertion of [his] rights" after it distributed his news-breaking earthquake photos all over the world without his permission."
      INTERVIEW WITH DAVID DUCHEMIN
      Get the file here – Download MP3 file

      Listen to it here –
      www.pixelcorps.tv/twip_152

      Comments

      Lens Correction in Photoshop CS5

      By their very nature, lenses add distortion to the images they capture. I've posted a new tutorial over at TipSquirrel.com that addressed how to fix lens distortion for both stills and video.



      “One of the commands in Photoshop CS5 that received a major makeover is the Lens Correction command. It’s no longer buried, rather it sits proudly near the top of the filter menu. Adobe now ties the filter to specific lenses in the file’s metadata. You can even create your own lens profiles with a great utility. Visit http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/lensprofile_creator/ for full details.”

      Check out the
      full tutorial here for free.


      Comments

      Understanding Photoshop – Creating Panoramic Photos App is FREE Two Days Only

      I am releasing the Understanding Adobe Photoshop – Creating Panoramic Photos iPhone/iPod/iPad application for free through June 4. Please spread the news to all your photo friends.

      Until June 5... we are giving this application away for free. Learn how to create breathtaking panoramic photographs using Adobe Photoshop® and your digital camera. This innovative application combines the latest in knowledge and technology to accelerate your learning.

      • Includes 15 training videos edited specifically for the iPhone or iPod Touch.  Offers easily viewable screens, with zooms and close-ups of the action.
      • Every lesson includes hands-on files that you download to your computer.  There’s no need to merely watch, you can try out every technique on your own.
      • Test your knowledge with interactive quizzes.  Score yourself as well as check your answers with video responses.
      • Search throughout the application by keyword and your own bookmarks.
      • A quick reference guide is also included to help build your skills.
      • Interact with the trainer with comments and a Twitter client.
        Additionally a quick reference guide for shooting panoramic photos is included for quick reference in the field.

      TO SWITCH VIDEOS – SWIPE YOUR FINGER ACROSS THUMBNAILS

      If you like it, please consider a small donation to the Pancreatic Cancer Action – http://www.pancan.org/ in memory of Marilyn Marlowe.

      Comments

      New Aperture 3 Training

      Since Aperture is the number one search term on my blog... I wanted to let you know that I have two Aperture 3 training titles out from Kelby Training.

      Professional Adjustments with Aperture 3
      Professional film and video editor Richard Harrington shows viewers how to bring out the best in their photography using Aperture 3. Follow along with course project files and learn how make corrections, adjust color, and add style to your images using a variety of tools inside Aperture 3.


      Make the Move to Aperture 3
      Aperture 3 is a powerful photo management tool from Apple. It includes features for organizing, adjusting, exporting, publishing, displaying your photos, and more. Rich Harrington takes you through the software and demonstrates just what Aperture 3 is capable of.

      Also, a lot don't release we have DSLR Video training posted too.

      Editing Your DSLR Video on a Mac
      Your DSLR shoots video! Cool right!? Now what? You've probably got more video than you know what to do with. Richard Harrington created this course to help you with how to edit that video footage (using Mac software). Rich covers everything from in-the-field tips all the way to post-production techniques using Final Cut Pro, Final Cut Express and iMovie.


      Comments

      New Canon 5D Firmware

      Canon has released a new firmware update for the 5D Mark II

      This firmware update (Version 2.0.7) incorporates the following improvements and fixes.
      • Fixes a phenomenon in which the aperture exhibits abnormal movement when shooting movies in manual exposure mode and Aperture Priority AE (Av mode) using some Canon lenses (such as macro lenses).
      • Fixes a phenomenon in which the exposure level shown in the LCD panel differs from what is shown in the viewfinder when shooting still images in manual exposure mode.
      • Fixes a phenomenon in which the Wireless File Transmitter (WFT-E4 or WFT-E4 II) may not automatically power off when used for FTP transfers.

      Comments

      Creating Prints from Video Frames

      How do you take a great still photo with your video-enabled DSLR camera? That's easy, shoot in photo mode. You'll get the best quality and even the option of using a raw format. But what happens if you've got the perfect shot, except you're in the middle of recording a video clip? The good news is that you can export stills directly from a piece of video. There's just a few limitations.

      Resolution limitations of video

      You might be thinking to yourself “Isn't video really low resolution?” Yes, when compared to the native size of photos taken with your DSLR, video pales in comparison. But for many uses, such as web or newspaper, you can get enough pixels out.
      Currently the highest resolution you’ll get exporting a still from a piece of video that originated on a DSLR is 1920 x 1080 or approx 2.1 megapixels. While you aren’t going to make any panoramic prints of those frames you can still find a lot of great uses for them. If printing at 300 ppi, you can extract a frame that is about 6.5 X3.5 inches – in fact a lot of the figures that you’ve see in this book are from video clips.
      Read More...
      Comments

      Check out Digital Photo Expereience



      • I was a recent guest on Digital Photo Experience Episode 11. Be sure to check out the show.
      This is Episode number 11 of the Digital Photo Experience Podcast with Rick Sammon & Juan Pons.
      We hope you enjoy the episode, and if you do, we would greatly appreciate it if you could give us a positive rating on iTunes. Hey, it only takes a minute!
      To get the enhanced version of the podcast with images and chapter markers, subscribe to the podcast via iTunes here:
      DPExperience Podcast on iTunes

      Or listen directly here – http://dpexperience.com/2010/05/01/photoshop-world-part-ii-dpe-podcast-episode-11-may-1-2010/

      Comments

      Peachpit Photo Club Announced

      Be sure the check out the Peachpit Photo Club

      Don't miss the Peachpit Photo Club. It's held on the third Tuesday of every month, from 8 to 9 p.m. EST (5 to 6 p.m. PST). It's a webcast featuring your favorite digital photographers, such as Scott Kelby, Chase Jarvis, Chris Orwig, Joe McNally, David duChemin, and many more!

      The debut Peachpit Photo Club features Scott Kelby on Tuesday, March 16 at 8 p.m. EST! During this live webcast, photographer and bestselling author Scott Kelby will present some of his work, provide you with some insight and inspiration, and answer your burning questions!

      Then I'll be up with my co-authors on the new book "From Still to Motion." Join us April 20 8PM EST.

      Learn more and sign up at
      www.peachpit.com/photoclub.
      Comments

      Use Apple Pro Apps? Time to Update.

      Use FCP, Aperture or Logic? Be sure to download the Apple ProKit 5.1 update to fix memory leaks –


      About ProKit 5.1 (Leopard & SnowLeopard)

      This ProKit Update fixes issues with user interface software resources that are shared by Apple's professional applications.
      • The issues addressed include:
      • Corrected an issue with improper scrolling behavior.
      • Resolved memory leaks for improved performance.
      • Addressed layout of interface elements in certain application alert windows.
      The update is recommended for all users of Final Cut Studio, Final Cut Pro, Motion, Soundtrack Pro, DVD Studio Pro, Aperture, Final Cut Express, Soundtrack, Logic Pro and Logic Express.
      Get it here – http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1008

      Comments

      iPhone Photo and App Contest



      Adorama is running an iPhone photo contest until February 28th. You can upload photos here or photo for your favorite photo app here. There's been some great photos submitted so far – Click here. They have some pretty cool prizes too!


      Comments

      How to Automatically Add Copyright Metadata in Aperture 3



      Learn how to add copyright information to your videos upon import with Aperture 3. Just a short tip (banged out in the basement with my new Yeti mic to give it a test).
      Comments

      Apple Updates Aperture and Digital Camera Support

      I've been quite happy with Aperture 3, but like many of you... I looked forward to the first update to address minor bugs. Well it's here! Apple released two updates: Aperture 3.0.1 which has several bug fixes and a digital camera update to add support for several camera models.

      About Aperture 3.0.1
      This update improves overall stability and addresses a number of issues in Aperture 3, including:
      • Upgrading libraries from earlier versions of Aperture
      • Importing libraries from iPhoto
      • Importing photos directly from a camera
      • Memory usage when processing heavily-retouched photos
      • Face recognition processing
      • Adding undetected faces using the Add Missing Face button
      • Printing pages containing multiple images
      • Printing photos and contact sheets with borders and metadata
      • Editing photos using an external editor
      • Display of images with Definition and Straighten adjustments applied
      • Zooming photos in the Viewer and in the Loupe using keyboard shortcuts
      • Accessing Aperture libraries on a network volume Selecting and moving pins on the Places map
      • Adding and editing custom locations using the Manage My Places window
      • Switching between masters when working with RAW+JPEG pairs.

      The Digital Camera update also added several new cameras to Aperture and iPhoto.
      • Hasselblad H3DII-50
      • Leica M9
      • Leica X1
      • Olympus E-P1
      • Olympus E-P2
      • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1
      • Pentax K-7
      • Pentax K-x
      • Sony Alpha DSLR-A500
      • Sony Alpha DSLR-A550
      • Sony Alpha DSLR-A850


      Comments

      Startup Memories of Adobe Photoshop



      In this documentary, the founders of Adobe Photoshop - John Knoll, Thomas Knoll, Russell Brown, and Steve Guttman - tell the story of how an amazing coincidence of circumstances, that came together at just the right time 20 years ago, spawned a cultural paradigm shift unparalleled in our lifetime.

      Comments

      Shooting JPEG vs. Raw

      When digital cameras became commercially available, the memory cards used to store pictures were very expensive. Photographers could not afford multiple or high-capacity cards, so they wanted more images to fit on a single, smaller card. Smaller file sizes would also enable consumers who lacked an understanding of digital imaging to attach photos to email with minimum technical headaches.

      With these two scenarios in place, manufacturers turned to an Internet-friendly format, JPEG. It was a proven technology, and one that was familiar to many users. A JPEG file looks for areas where pixel detail is repeated, such as the color white on every key of your computer keyboard. The file then discards repeated information and tells the computer to repeat certain color values or data to re-create the image. The drawback is that a JPEG file is lossy, so every time you modify it and re-save, additional compression is applied to the image.

      Newer digital cameras, generally the pro models, offer newer formats, usually called raw. These raw (or native) formats have several benefits over shooting to JPEG. The images are usually captured at a higher bit depth, which means that the pixels contain more information about the color values in the image. Most raw files have a depth of 10, 12, or even 16-bits per channel instead of the 8 used by JPEG. This raw format also has a greater tonal range, resulting in better exposure for shadows and highlights.


      The image on the left is how the camera captured a JPEG. Making adjustments to the image is possible, but will lead to more degradation in image quality. The image on the right is a properly developed raw file. Working with raw files gives you access to greater control over an image.

      The raw file captures the unprocessed data from the camera’s image sensor. While your camera may contain settings for sharpness, exposure, or lighting conditions, the raw file stores that info as modifiable information and captures the original (unmodified) data that came through your camera’s sensors. Each manufacturer treats the format differently, using a proprietary format. Fortunately, Photoshop and Aperture frequently update their raw technology to support the newest cameras on the market.

      Because the raw data is unprocessed, you must essentially “develop” the image data within Photoshop or Aperture. You can choose to adjust several options related to the image, as well as the lens and lighting conditions. You can “tweak” the image after shooting it (as opposed to JPEG, which is limited to the settings you had when shooting).

      For more tips like this, check out the book Video Made on a Mac.


      Comments

      Join Me in San Jose on 1/25 for TWiP Meetup

      The This Week in Photography (TWiP) Meetup Group

      If you're into digital photography and live in Northern California... join me on Monday, January 25. I'll be attending the TWiP / SmugMug 2010 Town Hall Meetup. The group is organized by Frederick Johnson (@fredeickvan) and is a group for photographers looking to share knowledge and learn.

      Here are the details.

      Location
      San Jose Library (West Valley Branch)
      1243 San Tomas Aquino Road
      San Jose, CA 95117

      Also, Frederick promises –
      "I'll be giving one lucky member a *HUGE* prize (you know me). You won't want to miss this meeting."

      See you Monday at 7pm



      Comments

      This Week in Photography #124

      Thanks a lot to Frederick Johnson and Alex Lindsay for having me on This Week in Photography. It's a great show al about photography and related technology. From taking photos of the family to understanding how cameras work to testing state-of-the-art equipment, you'll hear it all on This Week in Photography.

      You can hear it on iTunes or on the web – http://www.pixelcorps.tv/twip124

      A wrap-up of CES and some of the cool, photography-related product announcements...an interview with HDR expert Tray Ratcliff...and a special guest host, digital-imaging expert Richard Harrington, joins the fray.


      Comments

      New Year's Resolutions for Photographers

      The folks over at This Week in Photography have a great post on resolutions for the new year. These are goals every photographer should strive for.

      "Now, I just have to commit the time and passion required to become a great photographer. In that spirit, I think we should all try to keep these 10 New Years Resolutions. Now, everyone say after me:

      1. I will learn how to use my camera.

      This seems like an obvious point, but we are all guilty of skipping our camera manual and just fiddling with settings. Ah, this one works right? Spot-metering? Why not. Hey, what does that button do? Seems to make things darker. Hmm. I'm going to admit something to you that I ask you to keep hush-hush. I haven't actually read my 5DMKII manual. I know. Horrible! I'm guilty of arbitrary button pushing and royally messing up shots because I don't really know how to use my camera. Let's all become technical experts of our cameras this year. Deal?"


      Keep reading over at their blog.
      Comments

      Aperture Book Gets Perfect Review

      Always nice to have one of my books get a 10/10 review – go team! Thanks to the folks over at MyMac.com for a detailed review of our Aperture 2 book.

      "Aperture 2: Professionally Manage Digital Photographs goes into every little things that Aperture can do for you. While you can easily see and use the sliders in the interface, it is not obvious by looking at them that using a modifier key will improve the tools' functionality. They are also describing features like round-tripping to an external editor, such as Photoshop. And if your camera RAW file format is not yet recognized by Aperture, did you know you can use a free DNG converter from Adobe to be able to edit it in Aperture without having to wait for Apple to update the software? I point this out, because historically speaking Adobe has been faster to implement RAW decodes for new cameras than Apple ever was."

      See the whole review here.

      Get the book here.

      Comments

      Sizing Digital Images in Adobe Photoshop CS4

      Once you’ve acquired your digital images, you’ll need to size them for your project (as well as ultimate output). For many Photoshop users, such as photographers, this may be as straightforward as cropping and sizing. This chapter explores several techniques for sizing your images. You’ll learn about the concept of resampling, which addresses how the computer adds or subtracts information from a digital image while trying to retain detail and clarity.

      The second part of the image-sizing puzzle is a clear understanding of these output requirements. What resolution does your printer need? Are you sending the image to a service provider such as a developer or commercial printer? You’ll need to make lots of choices, but they should be based on where the image needs to end up. Do not make assumptions when starting a project. Know the destination of your image so you’ll know which path to take.

      KEEP READING AT PEACHPIT.com

      Get the Book


      Comments

      Color Correction and Enhancement with Adobe Photoshop CS4

      Photoshop offers a wide range of features for rescuing washed-out faces, teasing subjects out of the shadows, and adding richness and depth to images. Rich Harrington explores some of the most useful Photoshop options for bringing life-giving color to your photos.

      Learning how to spot problems and then choosing the right correction technique is an essential part of mastering Photoshop. Several different tools are available, some more useful than others. By analyzing the most important tools and determining in which situations they might help you, a more thorough understanding of color correction is possible.

      The primary purpose of Photoshop is to act as a digital darkroom, where images can be corrected, enhanced, and refined. How do you know an image needs touch-up? You can pretty much assume that every image can look a little (or even a lot) better than how the camera captured it. Whether it's adjusting the exposure, increasing contrast, or boosting saturation, Photoshop is the place to improve an image.

      KEEP READING AT PEACHPIT.com

      Get the Book


      Comments

      Photographers of the World – Give Back



      Are you a photographer? Take a moment to watch these two videos and sign up. This is a great idea and very needed. For more info please visit http://www.help-portrait.com. You can find a local group here – http://community.help-portrait.com/groups.





      Comments

      Our Photoshop Training Apps are on Sale


      What are folks saying about our new apps?

      Quick Fixes has 23 reviews in the iTtunes store (24 are 5-start and 1 4-star)! People love this app.

      • Terry White made it his pick of the week.
      • Jeff Revell at PhotoWalkPro write a very detailed review too.
      • My son thinks it's cool that I used his picture in one of the lessons

      If you haven't tried our new training apps, what are you waiting for?

      How about our sale!

      Understanding Photoshop Quick Fixes is
      $1.99 | iTunesWeb Demo
      Understanding Photoshop Creating Panoramic Photos is
      $3.99 | iTunesWeb Demo
      (prices good through November 30)

      These apps are a lot of work, but I want to see them succeed. We've lowered the prices temporarily so more people will try them out. Tell your friends and try them out (the feedback has been overwhelmingly possitive).

      • Includes training videos edited specifically for the iPhone or iPod Touch.
      • Offers easily viewable screens, with zooms and close-ups of the action.
      • Every lesson includes hands-on files that you download to your computer. There’s no need to merely watch, you can try out every technique on your own.
      • Test your knowledge with interactive quizzes. Score yourself as well as check your answers with video responses.
      • Search throughout the application by keyword and your own bookmarks.
      • A quick reference guide is also included to help you build your Photoshop knowledge.
      • Interact with the trainer with comments and a Twitter client.





      Comments

      My Day at Photo Plus Expo

      I spent the day in New York city at the 2009 Photo Plus Expo show. It was just a one day trip (thanks Amtrak Acela). I went up for lots of reasons, but here's some of the gear I saw that looked interesting.

      Drobo Pro

      I spent a lot of time looking at the Drobo Pro in-depth.
      This seems to be the perfect box for creatives who need data redundancy. You can place up to 8 drives in the rack (adding them as you go and even mixing and matching sizes). Current drive capacities mean you can store 16TB, but the Drobo folks tell me 3 TB drives are just around the corner (which means 24TB in a rack). .

      What's also nice is that you get two options of data redundancy. The Drobo can have protectio so one or two drives can fail and your data is still safe.

      The Drobo also offers three interface connections:
      • FireWire 800
      • USB 2.0
      • iSCSI (utilizes Gigabit Ethernet)

      It's iSCSI that promse some great options for perfomance.

      What I also like is that the Drobo Pro can be rackmounted or placed on a desk.


      Hoodman HoodEYE 3.0


      I'm
      a big fan of my Hoodman HoodLoupe to make it easier to view the monitor on the back of a DSLR camera. With the new HoodEYE you can upgrade your loupe. It offers an oversized eyecup with a temple flair – this helps seal of light when viewing outdoors.
      I am particularly interested as we are exploring using loupes like viewfinders for shooting video on DSLR cameras. Having the extraeyecup really does make a difference, but it is a very personal choice.

      Installation as an upgrade took only a minute, you can also order a new loop with the modified eyepiece include. They're also offering straps so you can attach the viewfinder. I'm up in the air on this one (compared to a Zacutto viewfinder). This is a much more affordable approach. I do prefer this loop (as a director) so its easier to go aroudn and check cameras, we'll try it as an active viewfinder next week and wil let you know how it does.

      Millenniata Archival Media

      The
      problem with mosts optical media (like CDs and DVDs) is that over time that start to deteriorate. Most discs use a dye to indicate where data is written. This process is called data rot, and it can happen with optical media at any point. Higher wuality discs are less likely, but cheaper discs can happen sooner. The exact point that this occurrs is unknown because the media gives no indicator of a problem.

      Millenniata has tried to solve this with their Write Once, Read Forever. The discs are based upon obsidian stone (and I tried to get more out of them.. but trade secrets). The burners use more energy to burn and the surface of the disc is MUCH harder. The results are a disc that is etched (as opposed to just using dye)

      While its not a cheap solution, (around $1800 list price for the drive and starter pack) the Millenniata folks are offering optical media that looks the test of time. The discs are also much better able to withstand temperature and physical damage. What's also great is the media is backwards compatible once burned, so you can burn with their special burner, then hand off to a client. They also promise to soon have specialty discs so you can print on the label face.

      iDC Follow-Focus


      Bruce Dorn is a Canon explorer of light
      and a photog who's jumped in head first to the DSLR video market. He's made a folow focus kit that makes it much easier to control focus when shooting video on a DSLR. The device is less complex than other units, as it uses a skateboard style wheel that makes gentle contact with the existing rubber rings on a camera. I played with it hands on and it looks worth testing.

      • It currently only works with Cannon lenses (although I am willing to try and make it work with Nikon)
      • 24mm f1.4 L
      • 35mm f1.4 L
      • 50mm f1.2 L
      • 100mm f2.8 Macro
      • 135mm f2 L
      • 16-35mm f2.8 L
      • 24-70mm f.28 IS L
      • 24-105mm f4 IS L
      • 85mm f1.2 L
      • 135mm f2 L
      • 200mm f2.8 L

      I'll be doing a more detailed write-up soon.

      Manfrotto 482 Micro Ball Head

      I stopped in at B&H on the way over to the convention center.
      This little beauty can mount on the camera hot show and give you a threaded mount. This will be perfect to attach an audio recorder to the top of my camera for DSLR Cinema projects. You can mount a variety of audio or video hardware directly to the camera. You can also rotate the mounting plate to a better angle as needed (works well if attaching a light or monitor).
      • height: 2.52 in
      • lateral tilt: -90° / +90° tilt range
      • load capacity: 4.41 lbs
      • material: aluminum
      • weight: 0.33 lbs

      Fat Gecko Camera Mount

      The folks over at Delkin Devices have comeout with an affordable mount for DSLR cameras.
      The Fat Gecko is a dual suction cup mount that can be adhered to a smooth, non-porous surface (like mirrors, cars, airplanes.) It appears rugged, but is still very cost affordable (I would still recommend using a safety chain... but I am paranoid when it coms to gear and insurance).

      • Suction cups can hold a eight pound camera
      • Double knuckle design and 2" extension tube allow for 360° tilt, 360° turn & 360° rotation
      • The ¼ x 20 tripod mounting screw allows for use with most digital still or or small video cameras on the market
      • Suction cups use a quick release function to make attaching and detaching you camera easier
      • Steel frame construction is rugged and durable
      • Four adjustable joints make it easy to tweak the shot

      You can see videos of the product in use at
      www.fat-gecko.com.

      Lensbaby Fisheye Optic

      Some people love them (I am a fan) others hate them.
      But Lensbaby keeps putting out great new products. They released a new option, a fisheye optic, that drops into their Composer lens.
      • Ultra-wide 12mm focal length
      • 160 degree field of view captures
      • Minimum focus: 1" from front of optic
      • f/4 optic with aperture disks that range from f/5.6 to f/22
      • Designed for use with the Composer, and can also be used with the Muse with a special adapter

      The lens won't work with the Control Freak lens. I'm told because it goes soe wide that you actually see the control cabels on the lens.

      That was my day... I saw a few more products I like and will try to post. The show runs through Saturday, October 24.


      Comments

      New Photos Posted

      I've added several new galleries in the Photography section of the site. I mainly grabbed old photos, but I did spend 2 hours editing some new pictures today.

      There are now pictures from Croatia, Bahamas, and Nevada as well as new HDR and flower photos.

      I hope you
      enjoy

      Comments

      Canon to Add Support for 24P on the 5D Mark II

      Canon announced today their plans for adding 24P video to the popular 5D Mark II camera. Here's the press release (with my comments in italics).

      Canon today announces that it is currently developing a firmware update to the EOS 5D Mark II to enable the recording of high definition 1080p video at 24 and 25fps.

      This is good news.... but no mention of shooting at 60P in 720 mode like the 7D. That is more exciting to me for the options for slow motion effects.

      The decision to develop new firmware to support these features has been taken following feedback received from cinematographers and photographers.

      Can you say overwhelming feedback, forum posts, and blog posts. Wow... nice to see some companies actually listen to their customers.

      Introduced in September 2008, the multi award-winning EOS 5D Mark II was the first DSLR product to offer full frame 1080p HD video recording, opening up a multitude of new creative possibilities for photo journalists, news photographers and amateur filmmakers.

      Amateur... PLEASE. Could companies please stop talking down to their audiences. The camera and proper lenses and gear is a minimum $7,000 investment. That's not amateur. Also... can anyone tell me the difference between a photo journalist and a news photographer?

      Since then, Canon has continued to develop its groundbreaking EOS Movie functionality, firstly with the firmware update to the EOS 5D Mark II that enabled manual exposure control, and more recently by introducing a choice of video recording frame rates with the EOS 7D and EOS-1D Mark IV

      Both nice cameras and worth exploring. We're writing a book and shooting a music video right now with the 7D and 5D. We'll let you know about the process more soon..

      Adorama also has a nice head to head coparison of the new Canon EOS-1 and Nikon D3S

      Canon currently expects the firmware update to be made available during the first half of 2010. An announcement regarding details of the update and its availability will be made closer to the release date.

      So please stop complaining... and asking us when... oh and first quarter means March 31... or maybe NAB in April.

      View the original here.

      Comments

      Budgeting with Apple Numbers

      For a quick overview on creating video budgets with Apple Numbers, be sure to watch this informative video. You can also visit the website www.peachpit.com/videomac in order to download the budget template.

      Comments

      Is it Real?

      The folks over at NPR have a great article on Photorealism.
      "Can you guess which one is a photo and which one is a painting?
      Quartet by Ralph Goings
      If you're going to do a painting that looks exactly like a photo, why even paint it? When asked this question in a written Q & A, photorealist painter and octogenarian Ralph Goings responded, "What I'm about is making paintings, and my camera is one of the tools I use. It's the artist's job to take the painting beyond the photograph."
      Keep reading the entire article
      here.
      Comments

      So You Think You Can Teach Photoshop Contest

      The fine folks over at NAPP are running a great contest to find more Photoshop instructors.

      "Anyone with a desire to teach others how to make cool Photoshop effects can enter this contest. No matter if you are a graphic designer, photographer, teacher, student, or hobbyist. If you’ve got the chops, the creativity and the personality, this contest is for you. You may enter up to 3 video tutorials for judging."

      The deadline for the contest is October 31, 2009.

      The prizes look great!

      One Grand Prize: $2,500 (USD value)

      • National Association of Photoshop Professionals – one-year membership
      • GridIron Flow software
      • Kelby Training Online Classes – one-year subscription
      • Layers magazine – one-year subscription
      • Kelby Training Books & DVDs
      • Photoshop World Conference & Expo Admission (plus flight and hotel expenses)
      • And Tons of Fame & Exposure
      • Plus, as the grand prize winner you get the opportunity to teach millions with a special guest spot on PhotoshopUser TV and Layers TV podcasts, in the pages of Photoshop User magazine, in an instructor’s chair at an upcoming Photoshop World Conference & Expo, on the PlanetPhotoshop.com and of course, visibility within NAPP to 71,000 members worldwide.

      5 Honorable Mention Prizes: $500 (USD value)

      • National Association of Photoshop Professionals – one-year membership
      • GridIron Flow software
      • Kelby Training Online Classes – one-year subscription
      • Layers magazine – one-year subscription
      • Kelby Training Books & DVDs
      Give it a shot – You just might win

      Comments

      Nikon Announces the New D3


      In case you missed it, Nikon announced an upgrade to their top product line. A new model, the D3s is coming soon. The camera looks to be a great upgrade, although for video lovers it's still using Motion JPEG compression (which is much grainier than H.264). The camera does over several other improvements that make it a nice upgrade.


      Me? I'm still playing with my D300S and will have more to share on video mode soon.

      Comments

      Photo Books Tip


      So, making a book using iPhoto is still the best. I sat down and was going to use Aperture, but it didn't have the theme I wanted (although both use the same engine and printer service). If you've never made a book, the process is a snap.
      1. Select the photos you want in the browser (pick more than you think you'll need)
      2. Click the Book icon in the Toolbar
      3. Flip from page to page (choosing layout options from the Toolbar)
      4. Drag photos in and scale and position using intuitive controls.

      Mini books start at $4 and larger books range between $20 -$30 depending on soft or hard covers. It really makes a nice keepsake for friends or even a new way to build a portfolio. But what about 'proofing?' Well you can share the book before you print it.

      1. In iPhoto, choose File > Print.
      2. In the Print Window, choose Save as PDF.
      3. Pick a destination, then name the file and click OK.
      4. Send the PDF to those who need to review it.

      The mini books make great leave behinds for clients or potential employers.

      Comments

      Two New HDR Photos with Photomatix




      I’ve been playing with the very cool
      Photomatix application for creating HDR images. Here are two (I am on vacation this week). The details:
      • Shot 5 Exposures
      • Handheld (less desirable for HDR, but out with kids and wife)
      • Shot +/- 1 stop each
      • Merged together in Photomatix standalone application

      Comments

      New Nikon Gear Announced


      Nikon announced two new cameras and a few new lenses. Scott Kelby has a great update at his site.

      Be sure to check out the
      full article by Scott as well as the official Nikon release.
      Comments

      A Great Example of Stop Motion Animation



      Olympus has released a re-imagined
      Pen Camera. The original was released 50 years ago, and cost about a a third less than conventional cameras. The camera was known for trying new technologies and innovative ideas throughout its history.The new camera allows for several lenses as well as HD video.

      To celebrate the new launch, the company commissioned a very cool stop motion commercial.
      - Shot 60.000 pictures
      - Developed 9.600 prints
      - Shot over 1.800 pictures again.

      Oh… and no post production!
      Comments

      Cool tutorial on lighting for photographers

      Check out this cool tutorial on lighting for photographers from Robert Louis Vanelli. In this video tutorial you will learn how to light a subject using multiple lights and what each of those lights do for the overall lighting scheme.


      Comments

      Great Video Interview with Bill Frakes of Sports Illustrated

      Be sure to check out this great interview with Bill Frakes of Sports Illustrated.

      “Bill Frakes is an award-winning photographer who has traveled to hundreds of countries to capture some of the most exciting moments from the Olympics to covering a six-man football team in the fields of Nebraska. As a staff photographer for Sports Illustrated, many of his images have captured the rough and beautiful essence of sports. His advertising clients include Nike, Coca-Cola, IBM, Nikon, Reebok and so many more. He’s won the coveted Newspaper Photographer of the Year in the Prestigious Pictures of the Year competition. He was a member of the Miami Herald staff that won the Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of Hurricane Andrew. He has also been awarded the Gold Medal by World Press Photo.”

      Comments

      Cloning an Image in Aperture

      Besides repairing, the Retouch brush in Aperture offers the ability to clone within an image. This works well to copy pixels from one area of an image to another as a way to hide imperfections or repeat objects. The cloning option is fast because it doesn’t attempt to blend pixels.

      1 Press X to select the Retouch tool.
      2 Select the Retouch HUD and click the Clone button.
      3 In the Retouch HUD, adjust the brush Radius and the Softness.
      4 Hold down the Option key and click the area you want to sample.

      Tip
      It’s often better to take a few strokes to build up the texture. Be careful as you clone so you don’t introduce stray strokes.

      5 Brush over the area you want to clone.
      6 Repeat brushstrokes as needed.

      Tip
      If you get an unintended stroke, you can choose Undo. If you return to a retouched image you can also delete a Retouch brush stroke at any time by clicking the Delete button in the Retouch area of the Adjustments pane. Note that brush strokes can be deleted only in reverse order because they’re recorded sequentially.

      Comments

      iPhoto versus Aperture – Part 1

      Welcome to Part 1 in our series comparing iPhoto to Aperture. I invite you to check out the Apple Pro Training Series guide to Aperture 2 for more information on getting the most out of this powerful software.

      Nondestructive Image Processing

      Both Aperture and iPhoto offer nondestructive image processing.At any point during the image adjustment process you can restore your image to its original state.Although both iPhoto and Aperture feature nondestructive imaging,they take a different approach to achieve it.

      Read More...
      Comments

      New Photos from Red Rock

      Here’s are two new slideshows I put together to show off four things.

      1. Some new photos from Red Rock National Park on Las Vegas.
      2. The new graphics plug-in
      Sliver Efex from Nik Software.
      3.
      Animoto Music Videos.



      4.
      Photoshop Express Slideshows.

      Enjoy and be sure to check out #2 - #4... if you are in Vegas... set aside half a day and visit Red Rock as well.


      Comments

      This Bag is Awesome – My thoughts on the Boda Dry

      At the recent Photoshop World conference, I picked up a new camera bag. This one is a lens bag, and is designed to condense your camera bag into a few lenses and essential gear. Be sure to check out the BODA Dry (a ton of the Photoshop World instructors and staff picked up on this). Here's what's cool.



      • The bag hold 4+ lenses (including long lenses)
      • It's very comfortable with both a shoulder and a waist strap (I find the shoulder strap more comfortable, but the waist strap fits well and has hip pads like a backpackers pack).
      • The product looks durable with waterproof bullistic cordura and even a very tight zipper to keep rain out.
      • It has a media card wallet, lens changing pouch, and even business card case.
      • The gear is designed to be used with one hand (and the thoughtful construction shows).

      I used the bag while hiking around Red Rock (outside Las Vegas) and it was a true joy. Very comfortable and very easy to use... I still love my Kata bag for lugging the gear, but when I trim down to go mobile... this one is great.

      Comments

      Don't Use Auto White Balance

      While you may be tempted to rely on an Auto White Balance feature on your camera, don’t. These can be overly sensitive to things like a passing cloud. Instead, just keep an eye on your monitor or viewfinder while shooting.

      Looking for an easy way to white-balance on a shoot? I just discovered the useful
      Whibal White Balance Reference Cards.

      Here's what I like:

      • Lightweight and single-card format.
      • Light Gray, certified to recommended Luminance
      • Includes Black and White Spots
      • Focus and Sharpness targets
      • Sturdy and Easy to Pack (it even floats)
      • Affordable
      Comments

      New Options for Web Galleries

      Looking for a better way to show your images on the web? Adobe has boosted Bridge with new web galleries.

      "
      Adobe® Media Gallery (AMG) for Adobe Bridge adds quick, powerful Web gallery creation to Adobe Photoshop® CS3, Adobe Photoshop CS3 Extended and the Adobe Creative Suite®. AMG makes it possible to create HTML or Flash-based galleries from any of the file formats supported by Bridge; adjust the galleries using the built-in preview; and export the results or upload them via FTP."

      The add-on is free... and works great with easy preview and FTP options. You can download the free plug-in at
      http://labs.adobe.com/wiki/index.php/Adobe_Media_Gallery.


      Comments

      Photographer's Rights

      I have personally experienced harassment first hand when it comes to urban photography. In DC, one routinely gets threatened or chased off in the spirit of 'national security.' So it was with great joy that I came across this entry over at Stu Maschwitz blog. I also found another helpful post at John Nack's prolific blog on the same topic.

      You can find a
      great PDF here that describes the rights of photographers (and videographers) within the U.S. Print this out and place it into your gear bag for the next time you get harassed.



      Comments

      Great New Digital Camera

      I have now made the leap to a new digital camera. I have been very happy with my Nikon D70 (albeit it's a few years old), but I have desired a smaller camera that I could keep in my laptop bag for the many trips I take. The thought being that carrying a full bag of lenses and camera parts isn't always going to be practical.

      I was about ready to give up my shopping quest (don't even get me started on the in store people who tried to convince me that I didn't need to shoot Camera Raw). But some research and photography buddies turned me onto Leica camera. I have purchased (but not yet received) what I think to be the perfect camera for my needs.

      The
      Leica D-LUX 3 offers a superb amount of pro features in a small package:
      • 10-megapixel CCD (18 x 24-inch prints)
      • Shoot both RAW and JPEG
      • Manual setting options (focus, aperture, ISA, bracketing)
      • High-quality lens takes (equivalent to 28 mm - 112 mm)
      • Ability to shoot three aspect ratios (4:3 - 3:2 - 16:9)
      • Optical stabilization and fast processing (burst 1 fps)
      • High-quality aluminum housing
      • Video Record HD 720P @ 15 fps & SD @ 30 fps in QuickTime
      • Choice between automatic or manual ISO 100, ISO 200, ISO 400, ISO 800 or ISO 1600.
      • Includes full copy of Photoshop Elements

      The cameras are back ordered due to popularity, so you'll need to allow a few weeks to
      get yours (I'm still anxiously waiting).
      Comments